Divorce Selfies Are The Newest Thing

More excited than out our wedding day. #heresyoursign #divorceselfie

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Divorce selfies are when a couple takes a selfie before, after, or during the divorce process — in honor of said divorce. Here are some of the best awkward, amazing, and kinda pure #DivorceSelfies we found.

HAPPY ED BALLS DAY

ed-balls-580

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In the annals of pseudo-holidays… there is none, to my mind, more pleasing than April 28th, on which Britons the Internet wide observe the anniversary of the time a distracted politician accidentally tweeted his own name… The politician in question is the Labour M.P. and Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer Edward Michael (Ed) Balls. At 4:20 p.m. on April 28, 2011, Balls was in a grocery store in Yorkshire, picking up the ingredients for his signature fourteen-hour pulled pork. Somewhere between the white buns and the watermelon, he got a call from an aide. The aide urged him to search Twitter for an article that mentioned him. Balls hit the wrong key on his Blackberry and tweeted the now immortal phrase: “Ed Balls.”

The rise of the QR code and how it has forever changed China’s social habits

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Thanks to QR code’s rapidly increasing usage at off-line shops, the amount of mobile payments on the mainland is now 50 times greater than that of the US. Mobile payments in the US totalled US$112 billion in 2016, according to Forrester Research.

To consumer behaviour researcher Chen Yiwen, we are witnessing the dawn of “codeconomy”.

“China has started the transition to a cash-free economy faster than anyone could have imagined, largely because of the viral spread of two-dimensional barcode,” said Chen, a professor and researcher with the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. “It creates a new economy based on scannable codes.”

From big cities to remote villages, the codeconomy is already changing Chinese social behaviour, according to Chen.

Some restaurants have pinned barcode tags to the chests of waiters, waitresses and even chefs. Customers can scan the code to leave a tip if they are satisfied with service.

Is Snooping on Teenagers Ever O.K.?

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Helpfully, recent research calls into question the utility of snooping and suggests better approaches for parents who are concerned that something might be amiss.

Adults who suspect their adolescent is up to something may feel compelled to cross privacy boundaries, but research on Dutch families found that the teenagers of prying parents weren’t misbehaving any more than those whose parents didn’t snoop. Notably, the same study instead linked parents’ snooping to their worries about the strength of their relationship with their teenager. According to Skyler Hawk, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, “the act of snooping seems to say more about what the parents are feeling than what their kids are doing.”

For parents who find themselves fretting about their connection to their teenagers, a new study in the Journal of Adolescence suggests that snooping is unlikely to make things better.

…“When parents engage in behaviors that teenagers see as privacy invasions,” Dr. Hawk said, “it backfires because parents end up knowing less.”

This App Helps Refugees Get Bank Accounts By Giving Them A Digital Identity

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If you move to Berlin, you need a bank account to rent an apartment, sign a contract for a mobile phone, or deposit a paycheck. But for refugees and asylum seekers–who typically don’t have the ID cards that most banks require–it can be nearly impossible to get an account.

A new startup called Taqanu is designing an alternative. Instead of asking for standard identification, it uses something that almost all refugees do have: a smartphone. An app installed on a phone can track someone’s digital data, including social networking, to prove their identity. Users will also create a “reputation network,” asking friends and family to vouch that someone is who they say they are. The app also asks refugees to upload photos of any documents they have, such as papers from a refugee camp in Greece. As the app is used, it continues to collect more evidence of someone’s identity.

How to Know If You’ve Sent a Horrible Tweet

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Twitter is a much-maligned, ever-burning furnace of existential dread. At its best, it’s an efficient tool for communication, even if that only means telling people to go fuck themselves. But unlike on other forms of social media, where the success of a post might be measured in terms of the discussion it generates—a busy comment section under a blog post, or thousands of comments on a Facebook page—on Twitter, provoking a significant response is actually evidence of the opposite. The lengthier the conversation, the surer it is that someone royally messed up. It’s a phenomenon known as The Ratio. While opinions on the exact numerical specifications of The Ratio vary, in short, it goes something like this: If the number of replies to a tweet vastly outpaces its engagement in terms of likes and retweets, then something has gone horribly wrong.

Instagram is Eating… Everything?

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Over the past year I have found myself using Instagram as a replacement for several other products. Although I’ve had an account since 2010, I have felt a steep increase in my own usage recently, I attribute this to a few unexpected use cases….

Instagram’s “saved” posts in place of Pinterest…

Instagram as a resale market…

Instagram as the location check-in…

Instagram Direct stole my Twitter DMs