My Month Without The Internet

Excerpt from this article:

We have all accepted that eating well and exercising are important to be in great physical shape. We’re now also starting to take better care of our minds by managing our attention. Our own attention is a scarce commodity. Where we focus our attention is how we feed our minds. Going offline helps to clear things up a bit more for me. So in 2015, I completed my second transatlantic sailing trip.

Disengaging with your current mind-set and existing habits, such as checking our phones, takes time — it took me three to five days to start feeling disconnected from my day-to-day activities, even with the sailing keeping us crazy busy.

Going offline trains your attention by allowing you to only react to the information you currently have — with no addition from the external world. It’s the opposite of getting notifications.

Going back to work after a monthlong disconnected trip is something I’m very grateful for: It felt amazing and refreshing. The experience helped me have a gut-check of how everything felt to me and identify what projects and activities excites me most. When I got back, I made sure to start focusing on tasks that I enjoyed more, and on which I could have the most impact. Going offline was also great for my creativity. On most mornings, around 5 a.m., we would use our headlamps to write thoughts and ideas on paper — it helped me come up with new thoughts and business ideas.

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