Where Are All the Nannies on Instagram?

 

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But there is one thing Ms. Dekel, 36, filters out of her Instagram feed: photos of the part-time nanny who cares for her children.

“Posting your nanny is like posting your address or your kids’ school,” she said. “It’s too much information.”

Nannies are often lauded as indispensable to keeping modern families afloat, but even as the rise of Instagram Stories — the 15-second blips that self-destruct after 24 hours — encourages peak parental overshare (793,000 followers of Eva Chen, Instagram’s director of fashion partnerships, know she packed a whale-shaped sandwich for her daughter, Ren, this week), nannies are hardly ever included in the picture. Some appear only as floating hands, popping a blueberry into a toddler’s mouth.

“They’re the forgotten faces,” said Tammy Gold, a family therapist and author of “Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer: A Practical Guide for Finding and Achieving the Gold Standard of Care for Your Child” (Perigee, 2015). “Nobody puts it out there.”

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What will travel look like in 50 years’ time?

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The future airport
Says who? Declan Collier, CEO of London City Airport
“With the airport of the future, your journey will begin wherever you want it to – you’ll be able to check in and deposit your luggage at your hotel, office or train station. You won’t even notice being searched as you pass through security. Your experience will be completely tailored – so your regular coffee order will be waiting on arrival, a virtual shopping terminal will be brought to your seat, and your dry cleaning will be handed to you when you land. You’ll board and disembark planes without feeling like you’ve been in an airport at all.”

Amazon Key Is a Lot Less Scary Than My Post-1-Click Remorse

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Buyer’s remorse is as old as capitalism, but online buyer’s remorse is the essence of the 21st century and endlessly refreshed. As internet shopping continues to creep into our lives, most recently with the potentially unsettling arrival of Amazon Key (speaking of sliding doors), consumers may feel regret more acutely than they do with traditional retail.

Those cookie-based ads and targeted emails reminding you of other possibilities reinforce the paradox of choice, the oft-cited theory of Barry Schwartz, the psychologist, that increased options leave us more dissatisfied.

‘I Forgot My PIN’: An Epic Tale of Losing $30,000 in Bitcoin

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The problem was, I was the thief, trying to steal my own bitcoins back from my Trezor. I felt queasy. After my sixth incorrect PIN attempt, creeping dread had escalated to heart-pounding panic—I might have kissed my 7.4 bitcoins goodbye.

I barely slept that night. The little shuteye I managed to get was filled with nightmares involving combinations of the numbers 1, 4, and 5. It wasn’t so much the $8,000 that bothered me—it was the shame I felt for being stupid enough to lose the paper and forget the PIN. I also hated the idea that the bitcoins could increase in value and I wouldn’t have access to them. If I wasn’t able to recall the PIN, the Trezor would taunt me for the rest of my life.

One Very Special AI Robot is Granted Saudi Citizenship

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Sophia, a humanoid robot internationally acclaimed for her advanced artificial intelligence, has become the world’s first AI device to receive a national citizenship. That news is more baffling than it might already sound, because granting her citizenship last week was the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a country that rarely gives foreigners citizenship and notoriously denies women rights to those of men… It’s unclear what great significance this announcement holds, as it resembles a bizarre PR stunt more than anything else.

What happened when I made my students turn off their phones

<em>Photo Dick Thomas Johnson</em>

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Initially, 37 per cent of my 30 students – undergraduates at Boston University – were angry or annoyed about this experiment. While my previous policy leveraged public humiliation, it didn’t dictate what they did with their phones in class. For some, putting their phones into cases seemed akin to caging a pet, a clear denial of freedom. Yet by the end of the semester, only 14 per cent felt negatively about the pouches; 11 per cent were ‘pleasantly surprised’; 7 per cent were ‘relieved’; and 21 per cent felt ‘fine’ about them.

Workarounds emerged immediately. Students slid their phones into the pouches without locking them, but because they still couldn’t use their phones in class, this became a quiet act of rebellion, rather than a demonstration of defiance. Some of them used their computers, on which we often search databases and complete in-class exercises, to text or access social media. I’m not comfortable policing students’ computer screens – if they really want to use class time to access what YONDR denies them, that’s their choice. The pouches did stop students from going to the bathroom to use their phones. In previous semesters, some students would leave the room for 10 to 15 minutes and take their phones with them. With phones pouched, there were very few bathroom trips.