Is the Immediate Playback of Events Changing Children’s Memories?

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The night of the elementary school talent show, we came home to celebrate with ice cream when my mother took out her iPhone to show a video she’d taken of my 10-year-old daughter’s performance.

Looking at the video, she said, is “definitely shifting the perspective to details about the way she looked, and also other details — maybe someone else’s reaction to her.” Not only could the change in perspective increase self-presentation anxiety but, “according to research, it could also dampen emotional aspects of the experience”…

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When a Country Bans Social Media

Mark Zuckerberg onstage with a microphone

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Sri Lanka’s ban on social media carries an implicit, and crucial, assumption: that the internet can produce good and ill effects, but its fundamental structure—a global information network that works more or less the same anywhere on Earth—is an unimpeachable given. But what if it’s not? What if the very fact of a global social network is impossible?

Poor People’s Privacy Can’t Be an Afterthought

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One of the tragic ironies of the digital age is this: Despite the fact that low-income Americans have experienced a long history of disproportionate surveillance, their unique privacy and security concerns are rarely visible in Washington and Silicon Valley. As my colleague Michele Gilman has noted, the poor often bear the burden of both ends of the spectrum of privacy harms; they are subjected to greater suspicion and monitoring when they apply for government benefits and live in heavily policed neighborhoods, but they can also lose out on education and job opportunities when their online profiles and employment histories aren’t visible (or curated) enough.

We found that not only are low-income Americans more concerned than their wealthier counterparts about losing control over how their information is collected or being used, but they’re also more worried about being harassed online or having their financial information stolen. And while societal fears about data breaches are widespread, identity theft poses a much heavier burden for people living on the margins.

Is your pregnancy app sharing your intimate data with your boss?

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Like millions of women, Diana Diller was a devoted user of the pregnancy-tracking app Ovia, logging in every night to record new details on a screen asking about her bodily functions, sex drive, medications and mood. When she gave birth last spring, she used the app to chart her baby’s first online medical data — including her name, her location and whether there had been any complications — before leaving the hospital’s recovery room.

But someone else was regularly checking in, too: her employer, which paid to gain access to the intimate details of its workers’ personal lives, from their trying-to-conceive months to early motherhood. Diller’s bosses could look up aggregate data on how many workers using Ovia’s fertility, pregnancy and parenting apps had faced high-risk pregnancies or gave birth prematurely; the top medical questions they had researched; and how soon the new moms planned to return to work.

Grassroots Goes Global

Owen Spencer in Hashtag FC's 2016 free kick challenge

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Increasingly in the UK, we are seeing the rise of what can only be described as “Sunday League YouTube teams”. At the very lowest rung of the footballing world, Sunday League squads tend to be made up of average people working a nine-to-five, who rarely, if ever, have time to train, and see their weekend kickabout mainly as a social activity. But these new teams are sparking a Sunday League revolution – using social media to reach an audience of thousands.

This trend kicked off in 2016, with the birth of Hashtag FC – a now semi-professional team that was started by Essex-based YouTuber, Spencer Owen, 30. After growing a following through uploading videos of himself chatting about football and playing video games while at university, Spencer put together a squad consisting mainly of his mates and watched in surprise as his subscriber base grew to two million.

The Biggest YouTube Beauty Secret Has Nothing To Do With Makeup

selfie

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“Since it’s a ring of light, you have this beautiful neutral zone in the middle and a ring of light around the face, so it gives a soft glow along the edges,” explains Musick. “It’s not a single source hitting your face, so it really helps wash out any blemishes. You don’t need to worry about light placement. You just put it right in front of you and it illuminates you appropriately. It’s really easy.” You’ll need a light stand to attach it to and that’s about it. Most come with a mount in the center of the circle for a camera or phone.

But as you can see here in a few (horrible) selfies I took at Racked HQ both in natural light and with hideous overhead office fluorescent lighting, I no longer have undereye bags or weird facial blotches. It also makes a fetching ring in your pupil that really makes your eyes pop, though if you wear glasses this reflection poses problems.

The Instagram Aesthetic Is Over

A pink wall

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Matt Klein, a cultural strategist at the consultancy Sparks & Honey, also says he’s seen a gradual shift away from the rainbow-colored preplanned photos that dominated the platform in late 2017. “We all know the jig is up,” he says. “We’ve all participated in those staged photos. We all know the stress and anxiety it takes. And we can see through it. Culture is a pendulum, and the pendulum is swaying. That’s not to say everyone is going to stop posting perfect photos. But the energy is shifting.”

“Everyone is trying to be more authentic,” says Lexie Carbone, a content marketer at Later Media, a social-media marketing firm. “People are writing longer captions. They are sharing how much money they make … I think it all goes back to, you don’t want to see a girl standing in front of a wall that you’ve seen thousands of times. We need something new.”