My Little Sister Taught Me How To “Snapchat Like The Teens”

Excerpt from this article (Brooke and Elsbitch are the handles of the two teens whom the reporter interviews), this whole article is full of fascinating digital behaviours:

ME: How long have you had Snapchat?
BROOKE: My new account? About a month and a half.
ME: New account?
BROOKE: Yeah, I didn’t like my old name, so I made a new account.
ME: So you lost all your friends…?
BROOKE: Not really. I used to have about 215 and now I’m at around 180 or 190.

ME: Tell me what your day is like on Snapchat.
BROOKE: When I wake up, I have about 40 snaps from friends. I just roll through and respond to them.
ME: How do you respond? Like, “haha good one, Elsbitch”?
BROOKE: No conversations…it’s mostly selfies. Depending on the person, the selfie changes. Like, if it’s your best friend, you make a gross face, but if it’s someone you like or don’t know very well, it’s more regular.
ME: I’ve seen how fast you do these responses… How are you able to take in all that information so quickly?
BROOKE: I don’t really see what they send. I tap through so fast. It’s rapid fire.

ME: What is a streak?
BROOKE: You don’t know what a streak is? It’s when you send a snap to one of your friends on consecutive days. You have to make sure to respond every day with a snap or you break the streak.

BROOKE: Don’t Snapchat boys that you like first — wait until they Snapchat you.
ELSBITCH: You need to have more than 150 views on your Story.

ELSBITCH: Don’t overload your Story. Nobody wants to sit and watch five videos. One video MAX.
BROOKE: If you’re weird, people will judge you. People don’t care as much as you do in that moment. Also, EVERYONE looks at Cosmo on Discover. If it’s funny, they share it.
ELSBITCH: Don’t reply to weird people. You could reply once, but definitely don’t get a streak.
BROOKE: Get trophies. It’s not a huge deal, but friends like to compare trophies.
ELSBITCH: Take a selfie on your friends’ Snapchats and add your handle in the text to request more friends. Still, don’t be desperate for followers.

Advertisements

Facebook Releases Guide on Transformational Trends and What They Mean for Marketers

Facebook Releases Guide on Transformational Trends and What They Mean for Marketers | Social Media Today

Excerpt from this article, via Benoit W and Paul M (thanks!):

Social media and digital technologies have changed the way we connect, interact, and really, the way we live our lives overall. But that influence has evolved over time, and as such, the significance of it may not be clear – if you were to tell someone that social media has changed the world as we know it, they’d likely scoff at the suggestion. But taking a step back from the day-to-day updates – the Likes, the selfies, the endless stream of emoji – move back from the superficial layer of the newly connected world and the wider societal impacts of social media become clear. Whether you know it or not – even whether you use the platforms or not – the impact of their presence are leading transformational shifts within our world, both online and off.

This, in essence, is the key focus of a new Facebook IQ study which seeks to “explore technology’s transformative role in our everyday lives”. To do this, Facebook commissioned research firm Crowd DNA to survey people from vastly different regions around the world and gather insights on how the impact of technology is resulting in shifts in attitudes, values and daily rituals. Facebook matched these findings against keywords and conversations around the same shifts across Facebook and Instagram, giving them an overview of how these elements are evolving based on connective technology.

Your iPhone Is Ruining Your Posture — and Your Mood

Illustration by Tim Lahan

Excerpt from this article:

If you’re in a public place, look around: How many people are hunching over a phone? Technology is transforming how we hold ourselves, contorting our bodies into what the New Zealand physiotherapist Steve August calls the iHunch. I’ve also heard people call it text neck, and in my work I sometimes refer to it as iPosture.

Posture doesn’t just reflect our emotional states; it can also cause them. In a study… compared with upright sitters, the slouchers reported significantly lower self-esteem and mood, and much greater fear.

Fortunately, there are ways to fight the iHunch. Keep your head up and shoulders back when looking at your phone, even if that means holding it at eye level. You can also try stretching and massaging the two muscle groups that are involved in the iHunch — those between the shoulder blades and the ones along the sides of the neck. This helps reduce scarring and restores elasticity.

 

Pew Research Study on Cellphones in Public Spaces

People Have Varying Views About When It Is OK Or Not OK To Use Their Cellphones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another report from Pew Research‘s “Americans’ Views on Mobile Etiquette”:

People’s cellphone use has injected itself into public spaces. This has blurred the line between private and public as often-intimate and occasionally blustering phone conversations have now become a common part of the background noise during bus rides, grocery shopping excursions, picnics, sidewalk strolls, waits in airport terminals and many other public venues.

To see how people are responding to these changes, people were asked about their views on general cellphone etiquette in public. About three-quarters of all adults, including those who do not use cellphones, say that it is “generally OK” to use cellphones in unavoidably public areas, such as when walking down the street, while on public transportation or while waiting in line. At the same time, the majority of Americans do not think it is generally acceptable to use cellphones in restaurants or at family dinners. Most also oppose cellphone use in meetings, places where others are usually quiet (such as a movie theater), or at church or worship service.

How Moms Use YouTube Videos: New Trends and Insights

https://think.storage.googleapis.com/images/how-moms-use-youtube-videos-new-trends-and-insights-hr-1.jpg

Excerpt from this article:

With a world of information at our fingertips, moms are going online with questions big and small. To better understand what this looks like for moms, and how online video fits into their lives and decision-making process, we partnered with TNS and Ipsos and surveyed self-identifying moms, ages 18-54, who watch videos online. We found that 83% of moms search for answers to their questions online. And of those, three in five turn to online video in particular.

We know that two of the main reasons moms use YouTube are for how-to and DIY ideas. As moms turn to YouTube more and more, brands have a great opportunity: to be there and provide useful content when moms are looking for help, product know-how, or even ideas.

Horrifying Email From Ex-Girlfriend Titled ‘A Few Things’

Kicking the work week off with an excerpt from a funny article from the always hilarious, yet spot-on spoof publication, “The Onion”:

His heart pounding in fear as he stared at the unread message in his inbox, area man Joe Dubbin reportedly checked Gmail at 11 p.m. Sunday night to discover a horrifying email from his ex-girlfriend titled simply “A few things.” “Oh, God,” Dubbin said under his breath as he worked up the nerve to move his cursor over the wholly unexpected message, a film of cold sweat materializing on his brow as he scanned the previewed line of text that read “Just so you know” followed by an ellipsis.