KFC Launches US$10K ‘Internet Escape Pod’ So Colonel Sanders Can Keep You Safe

 

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Most recently, it’s introduced an ‘Internet Escape Pod’, a cage that features a long-limbed ‘Colonel Sanders’ shielding its occupants from the dangerous depths of the World Wide Web.

The pod was created to help buyers get away from the havoc caused by the “hailstorm of coupons” and advertising usually associated with Cyber Monday.

Before you start envisioning a beautiful life where you’re perpetually tucked in the embrace of your hero, there’s a catch: the tent will take US$10,000 out of your pocket. For an anti-tech, anti-internet product, the price is no small fry.

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Bumble Promotes Anti-Catfishing Feature With a Food Truck

Dating app Bumble handed out free catfish to raise awareness of an anti-catfishing feature.

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What to do about a catfish — millennial-speak for someone who pretends to be someone they aren’t online?

Fry ’em up and eat them for lunch, says Bumble, the dating app on which women must message the men first.

The Austin-based tech company behind the app rolled out an airstream food truck in New York this weekend, serving fish tacos to promote a new photo verification feature intended to weed out phony accounts.

Cellphones in Hand, Saudi Women Challenge Notions of Male Control

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The three cases are part of a campaign by Saudi women, who have been broadcasting daring videos with their cellphones, using Facebook to organize street protests and posting Twitter messages to challenge the very idea of male supremacy in their famously patriarchal society.

The campaign, started by a loose network of activists who have enlisted young, media-savvy women, has gone far beyond earlier protests against the kingdom’s reaffirmed ban on female drivers, and has become a challenge to the pervasive guardianship system. In this entrenched system of guardianship, a male relative — usually a father or a husband, but sometimes a brother or even a son — has the legal right to control a woman’s movements.

What use is the right to drive, the young activists ask, if a woman still needs a man’s permission to leave the house?

Even among some of the activists themselves, there has been surprise at the response. “I’m very impressed; a few years ago I thought I was the only one who thought this way,” said Moudi al-Johani, 26, a Saudi woman who said she was locked up by her family when she returned from Florida during a college vacation.

The Last Emoji

sprint last emoji

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Sprint has unveiled the ultimate emoji as a statement against texting while driving.

…According to Adweek, Sprint and Alma chose Miami as the location for the sculpture, and placed it there April 29, because Florida remains one of the few states that does not prohibit texting while driving as a primary offense. This means that texting drivers can only be issued citations if they’ve been pulled over for another traffic offense.

‘A selfie with a weapon kills’: Russia launches campaign urging photo safety

Mock road signs created by the Russian interior ministry.

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Russian police have launched a campaign urging people to take safer selfies after accidents caused by high-risk poses have resulted in about 100 injuries and dozens of deaths this year.

In May, a 21-year-old woman accidentally shot herself in the head in Moscow while taking a selfie holding a pistol. She suffered injuries but survived.

In January, two young men died in the Urals while taking a selfie holding a hand grenade with the pin pulled out. The mobile phone with the selfie survived as a record.

In May, a teenager in the Ryazan region died while attempting to photograph himself as he climbed on a railway bridge and accidentally came into contact with live electrical wires.

“Before taking a selfie, everyone should think about the fact that racing after a high number of ’likes’ could lead someone on a journey to death and his last extreme photo could turn out to be posthumous,” Alexeyeva warned.