UN’s “Click to Save the World” Website

Refugee Crisis in Europe Families forced to flee their homes.

Check out this website, which taps into both the digital behaviour of people absentmindedly clicking because they’re curious for the next step, along with various personalization elements thanks to the data that we share online. An interesting case study, and compelling way to nudge people to donate to the UN Refugee Agency. Click here to save the world.

Thanks to Olivia Boddy in London for sharing the link.

Emoji room service is now a thing if you’re too lazy to call the front desk

Room_service

Excerpt from this article, and have a great weekend!

Aloft Hotels is launching Text it, Get it — TiGi, for short — in Manhattan on Wednesday in an effort to further innovate the hotel experience.

The concept is simple: In every room, there will be a menu of six packages that you can order. After texting the string of emoji (along with the last name and room number) to the hotel, guests receive a confirmation and whatever package was ordered will show up “ASAP,” according to the menu.

“Our guests can now talk to us like they talk to each other,” Paige Francis, vice president of global marketing for Starwood Hotels, told Mashable.

Samsung’s Funny Mother’s Day Ad Reminds You How Bad Your Mom Is at Texting

Excerpt from this article, which details an ad that:

… looks at how your mom probably uses text messaging—or rather, misuses it. The whole thing is pretty funny, and nicely pokes fun without getting too mean. And it sticks the landing by reminding you that you shouldn’t be texting with Mom at all this [Mother’s Day].

You’ll also notice that some of the moms’ phone numbers are visible in the spot. If you dial them, you get to hear what they have to say in their voicemail messages.

You can also show off your mom’s funniest texts using hashtag #TextsFromMom for a chance to win a Galaxy S 6 edge.

Lilly Pulitzer Has Created Custom-Printed Filters for Snapchat

Lilly Pulitzer Has Created Custom-Printed Filters for Snapchat

Excerpt from this article:

When it comes to this collaboration, the Geofilter is activated when a customer enters one of Lilly’s 31 corporate stores (including the Madison Ave location). Then they will be able to access a custom-made brightly printed geo-filter that will link to their phone automatically. All the customer needs to do is swipe left once the app is open, and the Lilly filter will be first, whereas if you swipe right it will be last after the default time/temperature filters.

Users can then play around with the patterns to use on the Snapchat application in a way that’s never been done before, adding them to selfies and group shots. Users have the option to send the finished Snapchat to a select group of friends, post it to their Snapchat story for followers to view for the next 24 hours or just save it to their phone as a keepsake.

Spoof Apple campaign takes iPhone 6 selfies to new levels

Also Shot on iPhone 6 spoof campaign

Excerpt from this article:

Like pretty much everyone else in the world, you’ve probably seen the adverts for the new iPhone campaign from Apple – you know, the big glossy images of impossibly beautiful snowscapes and forest scenes with the words “Shot on iPhone 6” underneath them? If you’ve ever rolled your eyes and thought, “As if anyone’s camera roll actually looks like that,” this post is for you.

Two pranksters have been putting up spoof iPhone ads all over San Francisco, only a few miles away from Apple’s own HQ in Cupertino. The result: Also Shot on iPhone 6, which is probably a much better reflection of what people actually use the camera function on their iPhones for.

And also check out this article on the spoofs from The Guardian:

These people live in a wonderful world: all magnificent deserts, rustic paths and well-shod feet (photographing your own feet is a particularly cool idea, suggests Apple). It doesn’t take a misanthrope to find this array of perfect modern beauty a bit false. No wonder a couple of Californian pranksters have been putting up satirical Apple posters that show, instead of ravishing sunsets, the kind of things they reckon people really take photographs of with their phones – clumsy selfies, mostly.

…Apple is right to preach beauty. All of us are in the gutter – at least Apple is looking at the stars. The fault of the iPhone 6 art gallery is not its love of beauty. It is the inability of modern photography to see complexity. The more our cameras make moments look lovely, the less we seem to photograph – or see? – the depth of reality.

…Not a single photograph ever taken has captured the richness of a city street seen by human eyes. Photos, even the best of them, are flat and arid in comparison with human perception.

This app helps you find and cheer up the saddest people on Twitter

Excerpt from this article:

A lot of people are probably having a crappy day and are tweeting about just how horrible they are feeling… Using Twitter’s API and MetaMind’s sentiment analysis API, [CheerUpper] culls the social media platform for downer tweets. When you click on the “Cheer someone up!” button, you are given a random, sad tweet to respond to.

And here’s a radio excerpt (audio) about this phenomenon, which is where I first heard about this app.

Editorial note: We will be taking a short break from posting while your digital insights blogger takes some vacation days (so no CheerUppering needed here!). Back after the UK bank holiday weekend with more fun, fascinating content.

Case Study: Social Savvy Burglar

Excerpt from this article:

Describing himself as a “nerd burglar,” he breaks into a couple’s home while they’re away and sells their stuff on the internet.

The campaign taps into a growing phenomenon of social media-savvy burglars. A 2011 U.K. study by Friedland, a home-security company, found that 78% of ex-burglars admitted to using social media to find targets. More than $16 billion a year is lost in property crimes, according to a 2013 FBI report.

…The story unfolded over eight ads that premiered during the Allstate Sugar Bowl, which aired on ESPN. The infomercial-style spots push an e-commerce site developed by Allstate where people could buy replica items from virtually every room in the Moskal’s home, including a blender, TV, weed wacker and their car. And they’re all at “Mayhemically-reduced” prices — dirt-cheap.

See also this case study video.