Me! Me! Me! Are we living through a narcissism epidemic?

It’s all about me …

Excerpt from this article:

The damage narcissism brings can be quite amorphous and ill-defined. “Much of our distress,” MacDonald notes, “comes from a sense of disconnection. We have a narcissistic society where self-promotion and individuality seem to be essential, yet in our hearts that’s not what we want. We want to be part of a community, we want to be supported when we’re struggling, we want a sense of belonging. Being extraordinary is not a necessary component to being loved.”

The full-blown disorder is associated with harsh, critical parenting, but a mass rise in narcissistic traits is partly ascribed by MacDonald to lax and indulgent parenting: “[With] parents seeing their children as extensions of themselves – they want to be mates, the boundaries aren’t set – the child gets very confused: ‘You’re great, you’re terrific.’ Maybe we’re not, maybe we need to know we’re just ordinary.”

There is a context even broader than Twitter: a competitive culture in which asserting one’s difference, one’s specialness, is the bare minimum for being market-ready.

Advertisements

We’re Not Nearly as Busy as We Pretend to Be, According to a New Study

Excerpt from this article, which has a link to the study (itself a great read!):

The Havas study says pretending to be busy has become a vital workplace survival skill thanks to our modern society’s tacit celebration of being overloaded.

“Our issue with time seems to be not so much that we have too little of it, but that we now equate being busy with leading a life of significance,” the report notes. “And we don’t want to be relegated to the sidelines. In an essay in The New York Times, writer Tim Kreider observed, ‘Busyness serves as a kind of existential reassurance, a hedge against emptiness; obviously your life cannot possibly be silly or trivial or meaningless if you are so busy, completely booked, in demand every hour of the day.'”

“It’s a reflection,” Maleeny said. “There’s been a lot of talk of the hyper-connected world, and that’s only going to get more connected as our cars get smarter, as we enter the world of flying cars and talking toasters, and I think that as that emerges, it’s going to be harder to disconnect.”

How everyone will come to grips with the realities of living with more strings (or WiFi signals) attached is still forming. Maleeny said millennials at the “crest of the wave” of connectivity have brought along older generations. However, Maleeny added, unplugged holidays and daily meditation time through yoga could become more common.

“You’re starting to see some pushback,” he said. “The joy of missing out, or JOMO, if you like. But the social currency [of busyness] is still around.”