Google Maps Pulls Calorie-Counting Feature After Criticism

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The iPhone app told her that walking instead of driving would burn 70 calories. While it was perhaps meant as an incentive to walk, those with eating disorders might instead fixate on the number, a dangerous mind-set that counselors try to minimize, she said… Some users were especially upset that the app used mini cupcakes to put the burned calories into perspective, framing food as a reward for exercise, or exercise as a prerequisite for food.

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Nike’s Super Simple Ad Takes Aim at Smartphone Addicts

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We’re all wasting our lives on our phones and social media when we could be out exercising. That’s the message of Nike’s latest campaign through Wieden & Kennedy, Portland, a series of simple ads in which a robotic, Siri-like voice informs us how much time we’re wasting “watching other people’s picture of their cafe macchiato, or their dog, or their baby,” while her words flash up on a black screen.

A one-minute spot, seen here, sums it all up: we’re wasting potentially 32 years of our life scrolling through meaningless stuff on screens when we could be packing in some more training.

Activity Trackers May Undermine Weight Loss Efforts

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Wearable activity monitors can count your steps and track your movements, but they don’t, apparently, help you lose weight. In fact, you might lose more weight without them.

The fascinating finding comes from a study published today in JAMA that found dieting adults who wore activity monitors for 18 months lost significantly fewer pounds over that time than those who did not.

The results suggest that activity monitors may not change our behavior in the way we expected, and raise interesting questions about the tangled relationships between exercise, eating, our willpower and our waistlines.

 

Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle

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…This tiny computer, in its obviousness and unsurprising advancements, keeps me in check and tells me what I often forget about – that I should get up and go. From a technological perspective, Apple’s Health and the apps I use are solid and useful; from a conceptual standpoint, watching that step count go up and up is a reminder that I’m free.

…I can track and optimize my lifestyle with an iPhone. An entire ecosystem of apps, services, and devices capable of monitoring my nutrition, weight, fitness activity, and even sleep uses my iPhone as the central, private hub that I control. On the iPhone, everything is collected and visualized by a single Health app, which can be connected to more apps. As a cancer survivor who wants to improve his lifestyle because of a newfound appreciation of life, all this is incredible.

…Tracking my life with my iPhone makes my commitment real and the effects directly measurable. Being able to open an app and be coached through workout sessions or use my phone to track steps and runs is empowering. iPhone software has enriched my lifestyle and it has allowed me to be more conscious in my daily choices.