Digital Insights and Inspiration

You Can Either Verify Whether This Inspirational Story Is True Or Share It Now And Reap The Precious Social Capital

Excerpt from this article:

It’s an inspiring story that proves that amazing things can happen.

When single mother Linda Roscoe was told her 5-year-old daughter, Emily, had a brain tumor and needed surgery, she had just been laid off and was without insurance. With no family or friends able to help, Linda didn’t know who to turn to. Amazingly, a decorated soldier who had just returned from Afghanistan heard Linda’s story, and he knew he could help: His husband just so happened to be a neurosurgeon willing to do the operation for free.

Emily is now a healthy 6-year-old who likes riding her bike and playing with her friends, and you can either verify that this actually happened or share it right now and reap its immense social media capital.

Yes, you could slog through news sites looking for another source to corroborate this amazing story. But by then, one of your friends will probably have already posted this to Facebook, and he will be the one swimming in likes and comments instead of you. You can be the person who is always the first to share amazing stories like this one with your friends, or you can be the person who bumbles around the internet, looking to see if things are true or not.

Your call.

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The Four Faces of Facebook

Brand X Journal

Excerpt from this article:

…Researchers also found they could easily categorize users into four broad types: ‘relationship builders,’ ‘window shoppers,’ ‘town criers,’ and ‘selfies’.”

Relationship builders: …does not consider Facebook an ‘open virtual social society but rather a mini-hub site for personal storytelling, where information freely flows between friends and family’.

Window Shoppers: Driven by ‘a sense of social obligation’ to be on Facebook, window shoppers see Facebook as an inescapable part of modern life…

Town Criers: They might broadcast information they feel compelled to share to a wide range of close and distant connections, but they’re not looking for a follow-up…

Selfies: …they do it primarily to call attention to themselves… to create a better—or different—versions of themselves.

Going back to Facebook after four years is a sad and scary experience

Facebook now has 2 billion users around the world.

Excerpt from this article:

I didn’t make a conscious decision to leave Facebook. It was similar to when I stopped smoking: every other time I’d made a song and dance about quitting I had failed, but when one day I realised that it didn’t make me feel good it dawned on me that I wouldn’t be missing out.

…So delving back into Facebook after a four-year break is a genuinely daunting experience. It’s like stepping off a plane and realising there’s a whole other world out there just carrying on without you. I am shocked to realise how much I have no clue about. The transformation of lives I once knew intimately. There are many babies I did not know existed. Last names changed with marriage. Sad death notifications. The shock of profile pages that are now memorial pages. These are things that in the past, even after moving away, one would hear about via text message or phone call or, even further back, through round robin emails and letters, but which now are collated on the internet’s noticeboard: Facebook. No need for any other town-crying.

Don’t Let Facebook Make You Miserable

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IT is now official. Scholars have analyzed the data and confirmed what we already knew in our hearts. Social media is making us miserable.

We are all dimly aware that everybody else can’t possibly be as successful, rich, attractive, relaxed, intellectual and joyous as they appear to be on Facebook. Yet we can’t help comparing our inner lives with the curated lives of our friends.

I Deleted My Facebook Account and This is What I Found

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Facebook has become a swamp of crass and obnoxious street fights and post-election hysteria where people are judging and sentencing others on the spot. It is the mecca for confrontational sound bites, click traps, and associated public lynching’s where people are hung on the spot if they dare to have their own opinion.

Moving On

A few weeks before the election I had had enough. I posted my goodbyes and announced that anyone wishing to contact me that didn’t have my number to reach out. This act was met with fear and uncertainty as I contemplated the action…

Immediately I felt a sense of weight lifted from my shoulders. The air seemed cleaner and the world brighter. “What would I do with my non-Facebook time?” I was excited, I contemplated the things I could do. Read an extra news story, perhaps write an article or two. Although the time I spent on Facebook only amounted to 10–15 minutes spanning the whole day. It had become time wasted. It had become a weight, and source of anger and resentment that lasted much longer than the time I dedicated to the act. As Facebook has evolved to its current state, it no longer served me and actually had become a weight of toxic proportions. This realization was not clear until it was no longer in my life.

Today, about four weeks later, I no longer miss it. I enjoy the reading of that extra story, have had several normal conversations with the people that are close to me. I’ve even spoken to a friend, previously connected with on Facebook, at a coffeehouse; in person. It was a marvelous experience.

 

When You Fall in Love, This Is What Facebook Sees

Excerpt from this article:

Facebook might understand your romantic prospects better than you do.

…The company’s team of data scientists announced that statistical evidence hints at budding relationships before the relationships start.

As couples become couples, Facebook data scientist Carlos Diuk writes, the two people enter a period of courtship, during which timeline posts increase. After the couple makes it official, their posts on each others’ walls decrease—presumably because the happy two are spending more time together.