Kitchen gadgets review: the Selfie Toaster – ‘a boasty-toasty aberration’

Rhik Samadder tests the Selfie Toaster

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The end times are here again, as proven by this toaster that can print your face on bread. The narcissist’s grill is manufactured by Burnt Impressions (other “Vermont Novelty Toaster Corporations” are available. Not really), to whom I had to email a photo of myself. I am intrigued by the plasma-cut metal stencils that arrive a few weeks later. Should you tire of self-cannibalism, other templates thrown in include I ♥ you, a CND logo, a crab and a lobster – these the biggest mystery (why two crustaceans? WHY TWO?).

What Your Yelp Review Says About You

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Here are a few common examples of Yelp review comments and their actual meanings:

“The staff was snooty” I felt intimidated by how fancy this place was and/or arrived underdressed.

“The actor/waiter was…” My waiter was extremely good-looking and I resent that.

“Not authentic” I’d like to take this opportunity to brag about my world travels to a bunch of strangers online.

“Hipster” There was kale on the menu and nobody else was wearing UGG boots.

“We didn’t get a free ____” I am a terrible human being who doesn’t comprehend how the economy works.

“The portions were too small” I’m probably from the Midwest and/or typically dine at large chains where I’m accustomed to being served a giant trough of food.

“Too scene-y” Nobody hit on me.

“Not enough vegetarian options” I use my dietary restrictions as a means to get attention and can’t accomplish that at an actual vegetarian restaurant, which is where I should have gone in the first place.

“The ______ was terrible” I lack a basic understanding of the concept of personal preference.

 

 

Ikea Makes Fun of Your Obsessive Food Instagramming

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IKEA just laid down the gauntlet for people who routinely strive to take the perfect photo of their food to post on Instagram. A new ad from the Swedish home furnishings company pokes fun at the ridiculousness of such habits by taking the process back in time before social media, the internet, or even cameras, showing a family waiting in agony to eat as an artist painstakingly documents a lavish banquet meal. Then, he prances about the countryside showing off the still life and raking in a series of thumbs up from passersby.

Millennials Eat Up YouTube Food Videos

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Whether consumers are looking for a flatbread recipe or watching their favorite foodie celebrity, food is thriving on YouTube. New research from Millward Brown Digital, Firefly, and Google delves into how YouTube is fueling the foodie fan culture, with insights into the audiences who devour food videos. They’re tuning in to watch videos that inspire, educate, or entertain. They’re loyal, passionate, and highly engaged, powering a 280% growth in food channel subscriptions over the past year.

 

Why We Love To Feast Our Eyes On Food Porn

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If you’ve spent any great deal of time on Facebook lately, you will have seen a growing number of short, colourful recipe videos from the likes of Tastemade and BuzzFeed’s Tasty. Rarely longer than 90 seconds, these clips have a hypnotic quality which has captured the attention of millions — and set their mouths watering.

The prevalence of this kind of content isn’t surprising; one of the reasons #foodporn photography has become so popular is that there is something just altogether satisfying about seeing a perfectly arranged plate. Video channels like Tasty and Tastemade have simply taken this one step further, condensing all of the best bits of cooking shows into short, snackable videos.

“The clips are akin to ASMR videos,” says The Cut’s Dayna Evans. “They tap into the pleasure centre of my brain with their mesmerising simplicity, lack of fussiness, and quick pace. They make cooking seem painless, sedative. In a sea of free-flowing content hitting my already-scattered brain (often without my asking), Tasty videos act as calming one-minute meditations.”

How Instagram is weaving its way into restaurant design

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Aliza Sokolow, who owns the Poppyseed Agency, which provides social media consulting (and Instagram services) for various restaurants in L.A., tells clients: “I can’t tell you how much money you’re going to make by investing in social media,” but if you/customers post a photo of an incredible egg sandwich, “people will think about that fried egg sandwich until they get it.”

Instagram’s role in a restaurant these days is more than just the stunningly plated (or intentionally wacky) food that compels a diner to whip out one’s phone and take a photo. Instagram is starting to weave its way—both consciously and unconsciously—into restaurant design, impacting table surfaces, focal point art, lighting and more.