The Psychology Of Notifications

Excerpt from this article:

What makes an effective trigger? How can you be sure that the notifications you’re sending are welcome and lead to higher engagement instead of driving users away? Below are a few tenets of notifications that engage users, instead of alienating them.

Good Triggers Are Well-Timed

…For instance, imagine you have a connecting flight and only 40 minutes to spare. As soon as you land, you’re worried about which gate to go to next and how long it will take you to get there. You turn your phone off airplane mode and, voilà, there’s a notification from your airline with all the right information. Your boarding time, gate number, and whether your departure is on time are presented at the moment you’re most likely to feel anxious. Now you can get to your next connection without having to frantically scan one of the terminal’s crowded departure screens. By providing information at the moment the user is likely to need it, the app builds credibility, trust and loyalty.

Good Triggers Are Actionable

Good triggers prompt action while vague or irrelevant messages annoy users. It’s important that a trigger cue a specific, simple behavior.

…The intended action prompted by the notification can also occur outside the app. Google Now tells users when to leave for an appointment based on what it knows about their location, traffic conditions and mode of transport: “Leave by 11:25 am to arrive on time.”

Good Triggers Spark Intrigue

…Timehop, for instance, sends a cheeky notification reading, “No way, was that really you?,” and prompting the users to open the app. To see the photo, users need to simply swipe. It helps that Timehop’s messaging is lightweight and humorous enough to be out of the ordinary.

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What Sex, Food, And Selfies Have To Do With Effective Social Marketing

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In 2010, researchers found that 80% of social media posts were announcements about people’s immediate experiences–Facebook status updates like Joe’s “OMG that is A LOT of snow” are the norm in social feeds. So in 2012, two researchers at Harvard were curious about this and decided to see how self-disclosure affects the brain.

It turns out that talking about our own thoughts and experiences activates the rewards system of the brain, providing that same shot of dopamine we get from sex, food, and exercise. The reward activity in the brain is also much greater when people get to share their thoughts with others.

Simply put, Joe’s wake-up tweet gave his brain pleasure.

The 10 tech commandments to avoid digital shame

An embarrassed woman after a computer error

Excerpt from this article:

  1. Thou shalt clear thy browser history

  2. Thou shalt not mix up thy contacts

  3. Thou shalt double-check that Google search

  4. Thou shalt remember: thy phone doesn’t belong in the toilet

  5. Thou shalt not open that dodgy email

  6. Thou shalt take care on Facebook

  7. Thou shalt reply all at thy peril

  8. Thou shalt turn off autocorrect

  9. Thou shalt not throw hardware across the room

  10. Thou shalt not print weird things on thy work printer

Don’t Persuade Customers — Just Change Their Behavior

Excerpt from this article (free registration required):

This all seems quite intuitive until you stop thinking about customers as an abstract mass and start thinking about them as individuals.  In fact, start by thinking about your own behavior.  How easy is it for you to change?

Consider your own daily obsession with email and multitasking.  Chances are, you check your email several times an hour.  Every time you notice that the badge with the number of new emails has gotten larger, you click over to your browser, and suddenly you are checking your emails again.  This happens even when you would be better off focusing your efforts on an important report you are supposed to be reading or a document you should be writing.  You may recognize that multitasking is bad and that email is distracting, but that knowledge alone does not make it easy to change your behavior.