What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death

Excerpt from this article:

My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die…

I’ve lost plenty of devices before, but this death feels different. When my old iPad is powered down, it seems practically new; when I turn it on, it feels instantly old. Tap the familiar YouTube app, and I am met with a pregnant pause: one, two, three, app. Ditto for the App Store, Podcasts, Netflix and e-books. Newer games are often out of the question, which wouldn’t bother me much if Safari, the web browser, wasn’t constantly overwhelmed by complicated pages. My attempt to install an alternative browser ended with this message: Firefox requires iOS 10.3 or later. My old iPad stopped getting updates in the 9s. I wouldn’t say my old electronics always aged gracefully, but their obsolescence wasn’t a death sentence. My old digital camera doesn’t do what some new cameras do — but it’s still a camera. My iPad, by contrast, feels as though it has been abandoned from on high, cut loose from the cloud on which it depends.

It hasn’t been used up; it’s just too old. A pristine iPad from the same era, forgotten in a storeroom and never touched, would be equally useless. The moment it came online, it would demand to be updated; as soon as it was, it would find itself in the same grim predicament as my device, which has been at work for half a decade.

Advertisements

Three artists who find art in the finger smudges on device screens

Smudge Art 02

Excerpt from this article:

Wired recently featured Tabitha Soren’s project, Surface Tension, for which she photographed the fingerprints and smudges left on the screens of devices.

The marks on the glass screens that technology users normally try to ignore or get rid of are the focal point of SURFACE TENSION. The textural conflicts in these pictures record how we now spend our lives. They’re not just grime; they’re evidence of the otherwise invisible.

In an earlier project (also, weirdly, titled Surface Tension), photographer Meggan Gould took photos of her and her husband’s smudged iPad screens.

 

Heartwarming Photo Series Breaks the Stereotype That Today’s Kids Are Tech-Obsessed

Excerpt from this article:

…Today’s children live in an age of iPads, smartphones and apps for learning. It’s not uncommon to see a child tapping the screen of a tablet in order to practice multiplication tables or preoccupied with a parent’s iPhone games…

Seattle photographer Anna Ream’s project “Comfort Objects” shows that today’s kids aren’t completely consumed by media. She has captured today’s children with the blankets and stuffed animals that they hold dear. The images are a candid look at the bonds between child and material possessions.