Apple: don’t use Face ID on an iPhone X if you’re under 13 or have a twin

Apple iPhone X

Excerpt from this article:

In a security guide published Wednesday, Apple recommends that children under the age of 13 do not use Face ID due to the probability of a false match being significantly higher for young children. The company said this was because “their distinct facial features may not have fully developed”.

While few young children are likely to be given a £999 iPhone, false matches are also more likely for twins and siblings. In all those situations, the company recommends concerned users disable Face ID and use a passcode instead.

For most users – those over 13 without “evil twins”, as Apple’s head of iOS Craig Federighi describes them – the bigger concern is deliberate attacks. Touch ID, Apple’s fingerprint sensor, was famously bypassed just two days after it was launched in the iPhone 5S, using a fake fingerprint placed over a real finger.

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Conversations with my iPhone

schmelling-conversations-with-my-iphone

Excerpt from this article:

iPhone: CHIRP. Your neighbor put a free dining-room set out on the curb.

iPhone: CHIRP! There’s a new podcast that breaks down every episode of “Hart to Hart.”

iPhone: CHIRP!! It’s National Popsicle Appreciation Day and your cousin Frank’s birthday and we’re twelve minutes from Panera Bread.

Me (whispering): What is UP with you? I’m in an important meeting.

iPhone: No idea what you’re talking about.

The little-known iPhone feature that lets blind people see with their fingers

The VoiceOver Rotor.

Excerpt from this article:

A few years ago, backstage at a conference, I spotted a blind woman using her phone. The phone was speaking everything her finger touched on the screen, allowing her to tear through her apps. My jaw hit the floor. After years of practice, she had cranked the voice’s speed so high, I couldn’t understand a word it was saying.

And here’s the kicker: She could do all of this with the screen turned off. Her phone’s battery lasted forever.

Ever since that day, I’ve been like a kid at a magic show. I’ve wanted to know how it’s done. I’ve wanted an inside look at how the blind could navigate a phone that’s basically a slab of featureless glass.

 

Toyota radio ad shuts down iPhones because drivers won’t

Toyota Siri radio ad

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Let’s be clear: It is incredibly dangerous to do anything with your phone while you’re driving. You shouldn’t be texting, checking your mail, or swiping through Tinder when you should be focused on all of the people and giant, dangerous machines around you.

But Toyota knows that despite all of the warnings and common sense, some people are just going to chance it anyway. So a new radio ad it’s running in Sweden is taking the choice out of their hands.

 

Spoof Apple campaign takes iPhone 6 selfies to new levels

Also Shot on iPhone 6 spoof campaign

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Like pretty much everyone else in the world, you’ve probably seen the adverts for the new iPhone campaign from Apple – you know, the big glossy images of impossibly beautiful snowscapes and forest scenes with the words “Shot on iPhone 6” underneath them? If you’ve ever rolled your eyes and thought, “As if anyone’s camera roll actually looks like that,” this post is for you.

Two pranksters have been putting up spoof iPhone ads all over San Francisco, only a few miles away from Apple’s own HQ in Cupertino. The result: Also Shot on iPhone 6, which is probably a much better reflection of what people actually use the camera function on their iPhones for.

And also check out this article on the spoofs from The Guardian:

These people live in a wonderful world: all magnificent deserts, rustic paths and well-shod feet (photographing your own feet is a particularly cool idea, suggests Apple). It doesn’t take a misanthrope to find this array of perfect modern beauty a bit false. No wonder a couple of Californian pranksters have been putting up satirical Apple posters that show, instead of ravishing sunsets, the kind of things they reckon people really take photographs of with their phones – clumsy selfies, mostly.

…Apple is right to preach beauty. All of us are in the gutter – at least Apple is looking at the stars. The fault of the iPhone 6 art gallery is not its love of beauty. It is the inability of modern photography to see complexity. The more our cameras make moments look lovely, the less we seem to photograph – or see? – the depth of reality.

…Not a single photograph ever taken has captured the richness of a city street seen by human eyes. Photos, even the best of them, are flat and arid in comparison with human perception.

Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle

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…This tiny computer, in its obviousness and unsurprising advancements, keeps me in check and tells me what I often forget about – that I should get up and go. From a technological perspective, Apple’s Health and the apps I use are solid and useful; from a conceptual standpoint, watching that step count go up and up is a reminder that I’m free.

…I can track and optimize my lifestyle with an iPhone. An entire ecosystem of apps, services, and devices capable of monitoring my nutrition, weight, fitness activity, and even sleep uses my iPhone as the central, private hub that I control. On the iPhone, everything is collected and visualized by a single Health app, which can be connected to more apps. As a cancer survivor who wants to improve his lifestyle because of a newfound appreciation of life, all this is incredible.

…Tracking my life with my iPhone makes my commitment real and the effects directly measurable. Being able to open an app and be coached through workout sessions or use my phone to track steps and runs is empowering. iPhone software has enriched my lifestyle and it has allowed me to be more conscious in my daily choices.

It turns out that owning a fake phone is actually something people want to do

NoPhone vs. iPhone

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What started as a joke from a group of friends who wanted to raise awareness about a certain kind of social problem smartphone users might have to deal with — ignoring friends in favor of your smartphone — is becoming an actual business. It turns out that there are plenty of people who want to own a “NoPhone.”

…The site continues, “We are selling the NoPhone to give the people what they want, a life of direct eye contact and improved conversational skills. A life beyond a smartphone. A life of NoPhone.”

As Phone Arena reported, the NoPhone is a phone-like brick that does nothing but let you feel its shape and weight in your hand while you’re out and about. The “device” costs $12 and ships anywhere in the world.