The best memes are nonsense and I love ‘karma is a bitch’

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That legacy, thank goodness, lives on with the latest meme out of lip-synching app musical.ly, brought to you by dozens of creative Chinese teenagers.

Called the Karma’s a Bitch Challenge, the joke is both simple to explain and impossible to explain, similar in spirit to classic Vine entries like “back at it again at Krispy Kreme,” “wtf is a chonce,” and “SKITTLES.” Simply put: teens lip-synch to a sound clip from The CW’s Riverdale, a show that is, itself, non-stop delirious nonsense and an absolute joy to watch. The clip is of Veronica Lodge — played by new Hollywood “it girl” Camila Mendes — saying “karma is a bitch,” in response to some news about a horrific car accident. After that, the lip-synchers change their outfits, expressions, or makeup in some dramatic way and the audio cuts to a clip from Kreayshawn’s 2011 viral hit “Gucci Gucci.” It makes no sense at all and why should it? It’s fun to watch. Each entry is approximately 12 seconds of bliss — far more than any of us has been conditioned to expect on the internet on any given day.

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Edinburgh nightclub meme: What was being said

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Actually, the two were at school together and hadn’t seen each other for a while – the now famous photo was taken as they were having a quick catch up.

Lucia admits she was pretty much ready to go home – which explains her expression.

And have they learnt anything from the experience?

“I probably wouldn’t have worn that shirt if I’d known I was going viral, I guess,” said Patrick.

“But… nah, not really. It’s just one of those things.”

Lucia said: “I’m just glad I did my make-up that night.”

I’m Not Here to Make Friends: The Rise and Fall of the Supercut Video

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The length and reach of these classic ‘cuts varied, as did their intent. Some were merely having fun, pointing out ridiculous, overused catch-phrases; others were serving as a sly bit of cultural commentary. A few of the best supercuts, like “I’m Not Here to Make Friends,” were both. “It was about exposing the tropes,” says Juzwiak. “One of my obsessions—and maybe my chip on my shoulder—are things that treat viewers like they’re dumb. And when you see the pattern, you hit back at it.”

But the ease of making supercuts also led to a glut of clips that were far less effective than the ones that had initially criss-crossed the web in 2008. Some of the new supercuts were at once more completist and less focused, collecting scenes that may have shared some connection, but didn’t make a real point: As much work as it takes to put together something like “50 Heartbreaking Movie Moments,” it feels more like an all-inclusive montage than a specific supercut. The very term had become a trope. “I’ve seen ‘supercut’ used to describe videos that are just things edited together,” says Robson.