Men, You Don’t Have To Write “Haha” At The End Of Statements

Following up on this post last week, here’s an excerpt from this article:

Here is an example of what I’m talking about:

Person 1: What’s up?
Man: Just at home haha

Hm? Excuse me? Hm, what? That you are at home is not funny. That you are at home is just a fact that is normal and fine. I understand you want to appear chill and don’t have the tools to appear chill in text so you have resorted to punctuating your statement with the onomatopoeia used for when something is funny but I’m going to have to give you this advice as a friend and confidant: don’t. 🙂

Here is another example:

Person 1: Did you have a good weekend?
Man: Yeah I went to the beach haha

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Men on Tinder Explain Why They Swipe Right on Literally Everyone

Men on Tinder Explain Why They Swipe Right on Literally Everyone

Excerpt from this article:

New research shows that men tend to like most profiles on Tinder, while women only swipe right on the people they’re actually attracted to. We asked men on the dating app why they’ll swipe right for just about anyone.

Those Lips! Those Eyes! That Stubble! The Transformative Power of Men in Makeup

Excerpt from this article:

My favorite person on Instagram these days is a guy who matches his makeup to his snacks.

…Watching Skelotim at work is mesmerizing. He slickly sets his makeup routine to pounding pop music, transforming from a regular dude into a sparkling vision of the fabulously strange. It’s just like Cinderella twirling around and around until she finds herself wearing a poufy blue ball gown, except Skelotim is changing into a Flamin’ Hot Cheeto. In the age of the selfie, what more appropriate canvas is there for an internet artist than his own face?

Skelotim is one of a handful of young men who have primped and preened their way into the female-centric world of Instagram and YouTube makeup artistry.

 

Video Games Are Key Elements in Friendships for Many Boys

Gaming Boys Play Games in Person or Online With Friends More Frequently Than Gaming Girls

Excerpt from this article:

In our focus groups, the responses to questions about who teens play with ran the gamut. One high schooler told us, “I play with everyone,” while another explained, “I play with friends and then I meet new people through those friends.”

…Other teens told us they liked playing games because they could be a different person. A high school boy explained how “you use an alter ego” when playing. And still others benefit from the opportunity to take out their frustrations on people they would never interact with again. As a high school boy told us, “If you, like, have a bad game, instead of throwing your controller, you can just take it out on them.”

…One middle school boy in our focus groups explained that he and a gaming friend talked about a mix of things pertaining to the game and their lives: “Like, we were talking about the game and then I’d be like, so, what do you like to do? And we would just share thoughts. Stuff.” Other teens told us that this type of interaction was “very rare.” And that usually it’s, “No hi’s. No bye’s. No hellos.”

Focus group data suggests that trash talking is pervasive in online gaming and that it can create a challenging conversational climate. As one high school boy told us, “If you’ve ever been on any form of group chat for a game, yeah. It’s harsh. … It’s funny, though. Unless you take it seriously. Cause some people take certain things personally.”

 

 

This Is How Men and Women Handle Email Differently

Excerpt from this article:

  •    Women tended to be a tad more verbose: Women had a median length of 30 words and a median response of 24 minutes.
  •    Men sent slightly quicker and shorter replies than women: Men had a median length of 28 words and a median response of 28 minutes.
  •    People replied faster to emails during weekdays and working hours; replies were shorter later in the day, as well as on weekends.
  •    Younger demographics sent quicker: Teens responded within a median of 13 minutes, young adults took 16, and mature adults, aged 51 and over, sometimes took upward of 47 minutes to reply.
  •    Older demographics sent longer replies: Teens had a median reply length of 17 words, young adults had 31, and mature adults had 40.
  • Younger demographics handled email overload better: Older users replied to a smaller fraction of incoming emails, while younger users replied quicker and to a higher fraction.

Meet the Lonely Japanese Men in Love With Virtual Girlfriends

A Love Plus player holds a picture of himself and his virtual girlfriend Manaka, taken in Atami during a weekend trip programmed in the game. Many of the users have a very sane idea of the game they are playing and the imaginary quality of the girls they are dating, others can no longer tell fact from fiction.

Photo: Loulou d’Aki

Excerpt from this article:

Some Japanese men are wooing girlfriends who don’t exist. While they can only interact with their partner through a pre-written script, these virtual beauties — Rinko, Manaka or Nene — offer a kind of instant emotional connection at the tap of a stylus. The girls can kiss, “hold” a player’s hand, exchange flirtatious text messages and even snap out in anger if the player leaves a conversation. It’s one of Japan’s biggest gaming phenomenons called Love Plus – available on the Nintendo portable consoles and the iPhone.

“There is no friction in these relationships, obviously,” says Loulou d’Aki, a Swedish photographer who documented a number of Japanese players earlier this year. “The girls behave very sweetly with the guys in what they say, how they respond to them, and with big eyes and heart-shaped faces—who wouldn’t want that?”

D’Aki teamed up with Swiss science writer Roland Fischer and together, they sought to go beyond the existing online conversation. “When you Google ‘Japan’ and ‘love’, you find all these articles about lonely people who never get married,” she says. “I didn’t want to reduce it to that. I wanted to show the human aspect, the individual stories behind those who use these applications.”

Her images reveal the secret lives of thirty-somethings who have accepted living alone instead of looking for love. They share a common yearning for connection and found it on a touch screen. Many see it as just a game and can easily distinguish between the computerized and reality, while others are perpetually stuck in a love loop, desperately waiting for the next update of the game.

Study Finds Men Are Twice as Likely to Take Selfies as Women

Excerpt from this article:

A quarter of men polled share selfies to make current or previous partners jealous, and one in ten did it to make themselves more desirable to potential partners. In comparison, half that amount of women take selfies to make ex or partners jealous (just 13 per cent), and only one in 15 (seven per cent) take pictures to make themselves more desirable to potential partners. The main reason women take selfies is to share what they’re doing with friends (35 per cent) and to record memories (26 per cent). But men and women are equally as likely to share selfies to show off (19 per cent). As well as taking more selfies, men are far more likely to show off their bodies than women – three quarters (76 per cent) of male selfies are shots of their body, compared to less than half of womens’ (45 per cent).

…young men tend to be nearly twice as likely to partake of the selfie craze as their female counterparts, and that the two groups take their selfies for completely different reasons. For a majority of the men polled, selfies are seen as a good way to attract a mate.