A Mother’s Voice Is the Most Effective Smoke Alarm

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A mother’s recorded voice will wake a child and get him out the room much faster than a standard smoke alarm, a randomized trial has found.

With the mother’s voice — shouting names, instructions or both — almost 90 percent of the children awoke and were out of the room in an average of under 30 seconds.

 

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Mom Was Shamed For Staring at Her Phone in Post-Birth Photo – Her Snapback Is SO Good

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Unfortunately, though, mommy shamers were quick to pounce on the new mom of five.

Many judged her drink of choice, but most called her out for not being more present with her just-born baby. One commented sarcastically, “it’s important to check your phone right now.” Another wrote, “she’s obviously googling parental advice.”

Although most of the negative comments were deleted, her legion of fans stepped in, sharing not only that she earned that hard-fought soda but that there was likely a very good reason she was on her phone.

Foul-mouthed mothers are causing problems for Mumsnet

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Such streams of expletives are causing trouble for Mumsnet. On August 19th the Times reported that sponsors were threatening to pull adverts from the website. Among them were Confused.com, a price-comparison site, the National Trust, a conservation charity and Bulgari, a jeweller. They are reportedly wary of being associated with increasingly foul-mouthed mothers. Are they right to fret?

To answer this question, The Economist examined over 200,000 discussion threads from one of Mumsnet’s most popular forums. We looked for instances of the words that Ofcom, the telecoms regulator, deems offensive. The analysis does not capture every curse. Some mums choose to self-censor; others use knowing acronyms (CF, for instance, means “cheeky fucker”). Nevertheless, a clear trend emerges from the number-crunching: swearing is indeed on the rise.

The occurrences of what Ofcom deems the “strongest” language (think C-words and F-bombs) have tripled since 2008. Terms which it considers “strong” and “medium” have also increased, at a slower pace. This appears to be at the expense of “milder” cursing (such as “God” and “bloody”), the prevalence of which has declined by a quarter.

Unsurprisingly, nothing gets online mums more riled up than talking about their relationships. Much of this is venting about husbands’ emotional distance, flagging libido or adulterous tendencies. By contrast, debates about the book of the month elicit, on the whole, much milder language.

Your Baby Boomer Mom’s Use of Technology Is Incredible, Not Embarrassing

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She has Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, which she essentially uses as intended by documenting her rad (post-retirement) life. There’s the occasional selfie with her girlfriends, dispatches from vacations and hikes, her favorite funny signs at political rallies. But the majority of her posts are homages to her children — me and my brother. She uses social media both to keep tabs on what we’re up to and to broadcast that information to her network of people. She loves to share my work (with simply the caption “Alana,” no tag) and photos of our family awkwardly squeezed into a restaurant booth and bathed in terrible overhead lighting. She also LOVES to interact with our status updates, as if they are addressed directly to her…

Rude Daycare Shames Moms for Using Phones During Pick-Up

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According to Mom.me’s Jeanne Sager, the sign was posted at a Texas daycare, where mother Juliana Farris Mazurkewicz spotted it and posted a photo of it to Facebook. Of course, the combination of daycare and phones is like blood in the water for the sanctimony sharks, and the picture is blowing up with more than 380,000 shares so far. A lot of them are cheering on the daycare, because you just know they’ve been waiting their whole lives to talk about this kind of “neglect,” preferably with a lot of exclamation points and pointed comments about how they “never” do that.

Still, many of the comments are defending the hypothetical phone-moms, pointing out that there are a lot of things these people could be forced to take care of at right that moment. (Are you a doctor? A lawyer? Waiting for important medical test results? Maybe you’d better pick up your phone when it rings.)

 

On the Internet, to Be ‘Mom’ Is to Be Queen

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In one particular shot, captured in an elevator and posted to the star’s Instagram (with 2.5 million likes), Beyoncé stares fiercely into the camera, her hand placed protectively on her young daughter’s arm, as her princess dress overtakes the floor.

As you may have expected, the Bey-hive (that’s Beyoncé’s fan base) went nuts: “SLAYYYYYYY,” they commented. The photo was “everything,” they squealed. It was so fierce they were all “dying” — like, literally, physically rolling in their graves.

And then there was this response, from a variety of fans:

“MOMMMMMM.”

 

“Will you be my mom?”

 

“Beyoncé is everyone’s mom.”

Like most things internet, the origin of “mom” — or at least, how most of us learned about it — can be traced to Kim Kardashian West. In 2014, when Ms. Kardashian West posed for a Paper magazine cover with her oiled backside glistening in full force, Lorde, the 20-year-old pop star, tweeted the image with only one word: “mom.”

 

At first, fans wondered whether she was critiquing Ms. Kardashian West. (Was she criticizing the new mom’s decision to pose naked?) Luckily, a fan wrote to Lorde’s Tumblr asking her to explain, for those of us who don’t speak internet, and Lorde set the record straight.

 

“I retweeted kim’s amazing cover and wrote ‘MOM,’ which among the youthz is a compliment,” she wrote. “It basically jokingly means ‘adopt me/be my second mom/i think of you as a mother figure you are so epic.’”

Why I Decided to Stop Writing About My Children

Illustration by Giselle Potter

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There is a hunger in our culture for true stories from the parenting trenches where life is lived mud-flecked and raw. I’ve written extensively, intimately, damningly, about my children for seven years without once thinking about it from the point of view of their feelings and their privacy. A few months ago I stopped.

I wish I could say that I deeply reflected on the ethics of writing about my children and heroically pivoted myself out of a concern for my character, but here’s what really happened: My father called.

He called me after reading a blog post I had written about my son’s first signs of puberty. It seems an obvious line-crossing that I wrote about such an intimate detail, but I did. At the time I didn’t pause for a split second; I was more than willing to go there. I had been writing and reading extensively about parenting tweens. I knew people might be mildly shocked, but mostly interested.

…I was always the narrator, the main character, even if I was also the storm-tossed heroine, the hot mess in mom jeans who couldn’t get the overalls on her 2-year-old. Or figure out fourth-grade fractions homework. I was working out my issues. My kids were always satellites to the big round-faced moon of me.

I’ve shamed their eating habits in chat rooms. I have Facebooked the things they’ve said. I have skewered them horribly, but also with great interest and affection, as a collector might do to some butterflies.