Where, Oh Where, Has My Little Dog Gone? Refresh Your Feeds

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MISSING/LOST CHIHUAHUA FOUND! Hey guys, my Daddy just found a lost and scared Chihuahua in the street in South Beach on 2nd and Meridian (south of 5th) at 1am this morning! She was terrified and walking in the middle of the street and could have been hit by cars. She was running away from my dad scared but some nice people helped us gather her and my Dad put her in his car and drove her home to me. We gave her a bath because she was a little dirty, poor girl. It turns out once she got over her initial fear she is super sweet! And as soon as she met me she started wagging her tail and smelling my butt! She did not have a collar on but tomorrow we are gonna take her to the vet to see if she has a chip! We are hoping that we can find her mommy and or daddy! If anyone recognizes her or heard anything about a missing chihuahua let us know. Also she may be blind but my dad's not sure, she has those cloudy eyes. Wishing the best for this sweety I already love her! I Keep wanting to play with her but Daddy is saying let her rest because she might have been through a lot 😩

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Excerpt from this article:

Thousands of lost and found pet Facebook groups have popped up all over the country in recent years helping to reunite pets with frantic owners. (If your area doesn’t have one, don’t fret. Community Facebook pages are just as dedicated to searching for lost pets.) One group, Lost Pets of the Hudson Valley, has 49,000 members, and eight volunteers run it practically round the clock. The group’s founder, Bentley Potter of Kingston, N.Y., whose day job is tuning skis at his family-run business, started the page after noticing an unreadable sign for a missing pet on a telephone pole.

Sometimes, Mr. Potter said, pet owners will find their animals merely minutes after a photograph is posted. “Without social media, I can’t imagine that this would happen that frequently or effectively,” he said. “So many people have told me that this is the only good reason for Facebook.”

Lost and found pet apps have also emerged: Paw Boost alerts shelters and rescuers, the Pet Safety App from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals can help you build a shareable “lost pet digital” flier, and Finding Rover uses an interactive tracking map and facial recognition technology to search participating local shelters, over 200 so far.

Introducing The Social Network For Dogs

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Excerpt from this article on OgilvyDO:

“Dogs are becoming the new celebrities,” says Cory. “They have millions of followers, and people trust them. It’s not like if a celebrity is selling a product.” These doggy accounts, most of which started out as just amateur photographers and their pets, have morphed into media brands. “They have agents, book deals, apparel… On the flipside, there are these volunteer-run shelters trying to save dogs with very little time or resources.” Cory and Jane wanted to find a way to combine this love of storytelling with a way to do good, and so together they founded Dogly.

It works simply enough; you download the app and share images and stories with the Dogly community. When another member loves one of your photos (it’s all about the loves, not likes) that counts as a donation towards your chosen shelter. The more creative your content, the more loves you get, and the more good you do. Shelters also use Dogly to post updates on adoptable dogs, and the shelter with the most loves at the end of the month receives a $1,000 donation.

Japan’s Robot Dogs Get Funerals as Sony Looks Away

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Photo: A Shiba Inu named Kuma looks at an Aibo robot dog that wanted to play at the Kofuku-ji temple in Isumi, Chiba prefecture on January 26, 2015. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty

Excerpt from this article:

In 1999, Sony launched a robot dog named Aibo in the U.S. and Japan that not only responded to external stimuli, but was able to learn and express itself.

…Despite the loyal fanbase, Sony decided to discontinue the bot in 2006, after selling around 150,000 units… For years following the announcement, Sony would repair Aibos that experienced technical difficulties. But in July 2014, those repairs stopped and owners were left to look elsewhere for help.

…While concerted repair efforts have kept many an Aibo alive, a shortage of spare parts means that some of their lives have come to an end. The following images show the funerals of 19 Aibos that engineers at A-Fun were unable to save.

…”It’s not at all unusual for people to develop strong emotional attachments to non-living objects or machines,” says cyberpsychologist Eleanor Barlow, giving the common examples of naming a car, or a child becoming attached to a doll. “Research suggests this can happen in order to satisfy a need in us…to care for something to improve our own sense of well-being or by way of a child substitute.”