The End of the “Real You” Online

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A quick experiment: scroll through your social feeds right now. How many posts/statements make you cringe? Sure, some heartfelt ones may be nice to see — if you have an actual connection to that person. But are they sharing that personal expression with thousands of people? Should they be? Even crazier: are some people you know saying things they absolutely shouldn’t be saying in public? Twitter has unleashed the id in far too many people. And jacked it directly into the largest and loudest megaphone ever created.

And so I’m left wondering if the kids haven’t shown us the right path here. For years, young people have been locking down their social accounts to new followers, opting to add (and remove) people on an ad-hoc basis. Certainly, in an era where your parents are on said networks, this makes sense. But it actually makes sense for a number of reasons. And many people I know who are not kids are now locking down their accounts — some even after years spent living in public.

 

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Woman shares intimate Instagram to encourage new mums to embrace their post-pregnancy bodies

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Okay, this is quite a personal post but I am now 4 months postpartum and beginning to embrace what my body has become, I’ve housed two beautiful babies for 36 weeks and breastfed for 5 weeks. My pregnancy wasn’t exactly an easy ride these boys wanted to come out early and I was hospitalised a few times because of dehydration and early contractions, our bodies go through a lot, a lot of change and your body is put through an enormous amount and I am so proud of myself that I carried such beautiful children and gave them food, warmth and most importantly all the love that I never thought I had. With a scar that I will have for the rest of my life is a tiny sacrifice for a lifetime of beautiful memories with my family. Your stretch marks DO NOT define you, your scar DOES NOT define you, your flab DOES NOT define you. You are incredible, you are a mother and you are the light of your babies eyes. I wanted to share this to show the reality of our bodies and that it’s okay not to be perfect because in their eyes you are exactly that. #identicaltwins #twins #csectionrecovery #babies #brave #scar #csectionstrong #stretchmarks #beautiful #perfect

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A British mum has shared an intimate Instagram photo of her post-pregnancy body in a bid to encourage other mums to embrace their bodies.

Emily Marson from Wrexham, UK, posted a photo of herself four months after giving birth to twins via caesarian, stating she’s “beginning to embrace what [her] body has become.”

 

 

‘Instagram’ for 18th-Century Tourists

"The Palio Race in the Campo in Honor of Grand Duke Francis of Tuscany and Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria" by Giuseppe Zocchi, 1739

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As a mantra, “pics or it didn’t happen” carries a clear whiff of internet-age modernity. But in many ways, the sentiment behind the phrase precedes smartphones, Snapchat, and selfie sticks by some 275 years. Eyewitness Views: Making History in 18th-Century Europe, a new exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, looks at the Enlightenment-era phenomenon of vedute, or view paintings: astonishingly detailed cityscapes of Venice, Rome, Paris, and other tourist hotspots. These canvases were highly collectible luxury souvenirs, pictorial portals that would later transport the visitor (and friends back home) to that faraway place and moment. Their strict perspective lent itself to formal gardens, neoclassical arcades, and canals lined with palazzos.

But vedute were more than glorified postcards, the Getty curator Peter Björn Kerber argues in his sumptuous exhibition catalog. They also served as proof that one had personally encountered the cultural and architectural marvels of Western civilization—a kind of proto-Instagram. Many vedute included portraits of the tourist or diplomat who had commissioned them. Others depicted newsworthy events the visitor had witnessed firsthand, from royal weddings to volcanic eruptions. Though dwarfed by their surroundings, the figures in these paintings are identifiable by details of dress or by their positioning, slightly larger than life or perhaps illuminated by a strategically placed shaft of light.

This Is The Antidote For Digital Narcissism

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What’s sad is that for some people, the vacation didn’t happen and the charitable work doesn’t count unless it’s on social media. It has to be uploaded, seen and liked to matter.

What you seldom see are the routine parts of people’s lives. The boring stuff like reading email at work. Poring over spreadsheets and enduring conference calls. Doing the laundry and vacuuming. How boring!

People only portray the cool stuff. The coffee shop photos or selfies in the gym, where they’re showing up their sedentary friends. They share this stuff because it reflects well on them. They know it will garner lots of likes. And that makes them feel good.

Finstagram – a secret Instagram account to post ugly selfies

Finstagram … post to a sympathetic audience.

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A Finstagram – or Finsta – is a fake Instagram account.

Aren’t all Instagram accounts, with their carefully curated posts and poses, in a very real sense fake? Yeah, sure, thanks Baudrillard. These are fake in the sense of secret – they are private, locked accounts set up in addition to main accounts, with access granted only to a chosen few followers.

Why? So that more natural, less effortful posts can be put up and read.

So … the fake account allows for more reality? Yes. It’s where you can post ugly selfies, private jokes, personal rants, pictures of outfits you’re genuinely seeking advice on, screenshots of funny family group texts, pictures of yourself in the middle of a good cry, that sort of thing, to a relatively sympathetic audience.

‘Sim or human?’ Model with cartoon-like features sends Instagram into a frenzy as fans debate whether she’s real or not

The latest Insta-famous model Lil Miquela has sent her fanbase of more than 65,000 into a frenzy as they debate whether she's a real person or not

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With her plump lips, huge eyes and doll-like demeanour, she looks as if she could have stepped straight out of a video game

So perhaps it’s no wonder the latest Insta-famous model Lil Miquela has sent her fanbase of more than 65,000 into a frenzy as they debate whether she’s a real person or not.

Miquela regularly treats her Instagram followers to pictures of her posing in off-duty model worthy athleisure, visiting nightclubs and art galleries.