Why Are Bots Unable to Check “I Am Not a Robot” Checkboxes?

iStock.com/Oleksandr Hruts

Excerpt from this article:

So why is all this hard for a bot to beat? Because now you’ve got a ridiculous amount of messy human behaviors to simulate, and they’re almost unknowable, and they keep changing, and you can’t tell when. Your bot might have to sign up for a Google service and use it convincingly on a single computer, which should look different from the computers of other bots, in ways you don’t understand. It might need convincing delays and stumbles between key presses, scrolling and mouse movements. This is all incredibly difficult to crack and teach a computer, and complexity comes at a financial cost for the spammer. They might break it for a while, but if it costs them (say) $1 per successful attempt, it’s usually not worth them bothering

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The man who was fired by a machine

Ibrahim Diallo

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“It wasn’t the first time my key card failed, I assumed it was time to replace it.”

So began a sequence of events that saw Ibrahim Diallo fired from his job, not by his manager but by a machine.

He has detailed his story in a blogpost which he hopes will serve as a warning to firms about relying too much on automation.

One Very Special AI Robot is Granted Saudi Citizenship

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Sophia, a humanoid robot internationally acclaimed for her advanced artificial intelligence, has become the world’s first AI device to receive a national citizenship. That news is more baffling than it might already sound, because granting her citizenship last week was the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a country that rarely gives foreigners citizenship and notoriously denies women rights to those of men… It’s unclear what great significance this announcement holds, as it resembles a bizarre PR stunt more than anything else.

Love in the Time of Robots

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Hiroshi Ishi­guro builds androids. Beautiful, realistic, uncannily convincing human replicas. Academically, he is using them to understand the mechanics of person-to-person interaction. But his true quest is to untangle the ineffable nature of connection itself.

…At any given time, students and staff may be testing, measuring, and recording the responses of dozens of volunteers to the androids at their disposal. What about its behavior or appearance, its specific facial expressions and minute body movements, do they find alienating? What draws them closer? These androids are used to find answers to an ever-growing list of research questions: How important is nonverbal communication to establishing trust between humans (and, therefore, between human and android)? Under what circumstances might we treat an android like a human? In this way, Ishi­guro’s collective of labs is dedicated to the engineering of human intimacy.

 

As Robots Replace Old Jobs, New Jobs Should Be Invented

Excerpt from this article by Garry Kasparov, former world chess champion:

Machines have been replacing humans since the first one was invented many thousands of years ago — and on the very next day it probably created new jobs when three people were needed to fix it. Humans are adaptable. We’re creative. We use machines to make new things, solve new problems and create whole industries that we can’t yet imagine. Doomsaying is easy and natural. We can see what’s being lost, but we don’t see the new things until they arrive.

Japan’s Robot Dogs Get Funerals as Sony Looks Away

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Photo: A Shiba Inu named Kuma looks at an Aibo robot dog that wanted to play at the Kofuku-ji temple in Isumi, Chiba prefecture on January 26, 2015. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty

Excerpt from this article:

In 1999, Sony launched a robot dog named Aibo in the U.S. and Japan that not only responded to external stimuli, but was able to learn and express itself.

…Despite the loyal fanbase, Sony decided to discontinue the bot in 2006, after selling around 150,000 units… For years following the announcement, Sony would repair Aibos that experienced technical difficulties. But in July 2014, those repairs stopped and owners were left to look elsewhere for help.

…While concerted repair efforts have kept many an Aibo alive, a shortage of spare parts means that some of their lives have come to an end. The following images show the funerals of 19 Aibos that engineers at A-Fun were unable to save.

…”It’s not at all unusual for people to develop strong emotional attachments to non-living objects or machines,” says cyberpsychologist Eleanor Barlow, giving the common examples of naming a car, or a child becoming attached to a doll. “Research suggests this can happen in order to satisfy a need in us…to care for something to improve our own sense of well-being or by way of a child substitute.”