How I Lost My $50,000 Twitter Username

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My $50,000 Twitter Username Was Stolen Thanks to PayPal and GoDaddy

I had a rare Twitter username, @N. Yep, just one letter. I’ve been offered as much as $50,000 for it. People have tried to steal it. Password reset instructions are a regular sight in my email inbox. As of today, I no longer control @N. I was extorted into giving it up.

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Yes, Cops Are Now Opening iPhones With Dead People’s Fingerprints

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In November 2016, around seven hours after Abdul Razak Ali Artan had mowed down a group of people in his car, gone on a stabbing spree with a butcher’s knife and been shot dead by a police officer on the grounds of Ohio State University, an FBI agent applied the bloodied body’s index finger to the iPhone found on the deceased. The cops hoped it would help them access the Apple device to learn more about the assailant’s motives and Artan himself.

This is according to FBI forensics specialist Bob Moledor, who detailed for Forbes the first known case of police using a deceased person’s fingerprints in an attempt to get past the protections of Apple’s Touch ID technology. Unfortunately for the FBI, Artan’s lifeless fingerprint didn’t unlock the device (an iPhone 5 model, though Moledor couldn’t recall which. Touch ID was introduced in the iPhone 5S). In the hours between his death and the attempt to unlock, when the feds had to go through legal processes regarding access to the smartphone, the iPhone had gone to sleep and when reopened required a passcode, Moledor said. He sent the device to a forensics lab which managed to retrieve information from the iPhone, the FBI phone expert and a Columbus officer who worked the case confirmed.

People Are Actually Using a Joke Dating Site That Matches People Based on Their Passwords

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Finding love has never been easier—at least if you judge by the sheer number of dating apps available on the internet today. But it’s just as hard as it’s always been to find your real soulmate, someone who really understands your quirks (and may even share them), someone who shares your passions, and your password.

Wait, what?

Your Mother’s Maiden Name Is Not a Secret

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Security questions are astonishingly insecure: The answers to many of them are easily researched or guessed, yet they can be the sole barrier to someone gaining access to your account. The cryptology and security expert Bruce Schneier once described them as an “easier-to-guess low-security backup password that sites want you to have in case you forget your harder-to-remember higher-security password.”

There has been no shortage of incidents demonstrating these questions’ vulnerabilities. In 2005, Paris Hilton’s T-Mobile account was hacked by a teenager who, like anyone who searched “Paris Hilton Chihuahua” on the internet, knew the answer to “What’s your favorite pet’s name?” In 2008, Sarah Palin’s Yahoo account was hacked by a college student who reset her password using her birth date, ZIP code and the place where she met her spouse.

How many of us can answer the premillennial “What city were you in to celebrate the year 2000?” or “What year did you take out your first mortgage?” And how many Indian- or Brazilian-born users went to a high school without a mascot, or grew up on a street with no name? How many of our mothers never changed their names?

The other main type of security question asks for a subjective answer. Such questions imagine lives punctuated by distinct firsts and bests and filled with enduring favorites, but favorites and bests and even firsts can change when people maintain accounts for decades. At some point, both factual and subjective security questions become archaeological. “In what month did you meet your significant other?” requires a framing question: Whom were you with when you set up this account?

A 2015 study by Google engineers found that only 47 percent of people could remember what they put down as their favorite food a year earlier — and that hackers were able to guess the food nearly 20 percent of the time, with Americans’ most common answer being pizza.