Four out of five smartphone users check their phones within 15-minutes of waking up, reports suggests

Excerpt from this article:

While the trend in homes is to increasingly spend more time talking to virtual assistant Alexa, a recent report suggests that we reach for our smartphones within 15 minutes of waking up and our phones will likely remain with us throughout the day long after we have said goodnight, Alexa.

 

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Seriously, stop using your smartphone in bed

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Excerpt from this article:

It’s an inconvenient truth for an increasingly connected (and addicted) world, but LED screens are the enemies of sleep. A steady trickle of studies confirm this, the latest being a survey of 9,846 teenagers aged 16 to 19 in Norway, two years in the making and published Monday in the medical journal BMJ Open.

The teens recorded their sleep patterns as well as their technology usage throughout the day, with a focus on the hour before bedtime. The result? What researchers call a “dose-response relationship” — the more you dose yourself with devices, the higher your risk of sleeplessness.

“Almost all adolescents reported using one or more electronic devices during the last hour before bedtime,” the Norwegian scientists wrote. “Extensive use of these devices was significantly and positively associated with SOL [sleep onset latency, or the amount of time it takes to nod off] and sleep deficiency, with an inverse dose–response relationship between sleep duration and media use.”

Rationalize it all you want — a quick game of Candy Crush will relax me! — but the numbers don’t lie.

 

The Age of Alerts: Wake Me When It’s Over

Illustration by Christoph Hitz

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…Call me a selfish misanthrope who takes his sleep and peace of mind too seriously, but I could live with fewer of the alarms and alerts that keep coming at me these days… As may be expected, public response to Amber Alerts since the latest system was put in place a few years ago has been mixed.

To the system’s credit, there have been cases when cars with endangered children have been found. But even Marc Klaas, whose daughter Polly was kidnapped and later found dead, a tragedy that helped fuel the understandable hyper-vigilance of today, was an unlikely critic of the Amber Alert system that California rolled out in 2013. He told CNN that he believed it had great potential, but that he feared residents too far away to be helpful might be put off by the noise and opt out of the program.

That’s what happened here in July, when an emergency weather alert roused households at 4:19 a.m. from northeastern New Jersey to the five boroughs and southern Connecticut, involving flash floods that never occurred. Instead, it caused a flood of public and Twitter complaints.

The Wall Street Journal found New York City Councilman Pete Vallone’s tweet: “Like many NYers I’m waking up with the question, ‘how the hell do I get this ‘flash flood alert’ at 4 a.m. stuff off my phone?!”’ ”

Life After Cancer: How the iPhone Helped Me Achieve a Healthier Lifestyle

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…This tiny computer, in its obviousness and unsurprising advancements, keeps me in check and tells me what I often forget about – that I should get up and go. From a technological perspective, Apple’s Health and the apps I use are solid and useful; from a conceptual standpoint, watching that step count go up and up is a reminder that I’m free.

…I can track and optimize my lifestyle with an iPhone. An entire ecosystem of apps, services, and devices capable of monitoring my nutrition, weight, fitness activity, and even sleep uses my iPhone as the central, private hub that I control. On the iPhone, everything is collected and visualized by a single Health app, which can be connected to more apps. As a cancer survivor who wants to improve his lifestyle because of a newfound appreciation of life, all this is incredible.

…Tracking my life with my iPhone makes my commitment real and the effects directly measurable. Being able to open an app and be coached through workout sessions or use my phone to track steps and runs is empowering. iPhone software has enriched my lifestyle and it has allowed me to be more conscious in my daily choices.

8 Ways Tech Has Completely Rewired Our Brains

Braincircuits
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Technology has altered human physiology. It makes us think differently, feel differently, even dream differently. It affects our memory, attention spans and sleep cycles. This is attributed to a scientific phenomenon known as neuroplasticity, or the brain’s ability to alter its behavior based on new experiences. In this case, that’s the wealth of information offered by the Internet and interactive technologies.

Some cognition experts have praised the effects of tech on the brain, lauding its ability to organize our lives and free our minds for deeper thinking. Others fear tech has crippled our attention spans and made us uncreative and impatient when it comes to anything analog.

Every emerging study and opinion piece is hotly disputed, yet each brings us closer to understanding how tech can fundamentally alter our minds. Below, we list some of the major ways tech has rewired our brains, for better or worse.

Wake Up & Smell The Bacon — from the Oscar Mayer Institute For the Advancement of Bacon (OMIFAB)

From the YouTube description:

Prepare yourself for a bacon awakening beyond your wildest imagination. Wake Up & Smell The Bacon is a multi-sensory alarm experience that starts your morning with the mouthwatering sizzle and smell of Oscar Mayer bacon.

Download the Wake Up & Smell The Bacon app from iTunes: http://bit.ly/1fHGKBv

Apply for a chance to win a bacon scent alarm device at WakeUpAndSmellTheBacon.com