Your political Facebook posts aren’t changing how your friends think

Facebook politics

Excerpt from this article:

A staggering 94% of Republicans, 92% of Democrats, and 85% of independents on Facebook say they have never been swayed by a political post, according to Rantic, a firm that sells social media followers. The firm surveyed 10,000 Facebook users who self-identified as Republicans, Democrats, or independents, Wired reported.

The only thing those opinionated election posts are doing is damaging your friendships. Nearly one-third of Facebook users surveyed said social media is not an appropriate forum for political discussions. And respondents from each political affiliation admitted they’ve un-friended people on Facebook because of their political posts.

Even more users surveyed said they’ve judged others based on their political views. That doesn’t bode well for those who have turned Facebook into their personal political pulpits.

 

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People who post their fitness routine to Facebook have psychological problems, study claims

Facebook Fitness

Excerpt from this article:

Researchers from the Brunel University in London have conducted a study as to why so many people share every workout on social media. The results are unflattering, to say the least.

…People who are always keen on documenting their gym activities (or every time you simply go for a good, old-fashioned run) tend to be narcissists. According to the researchers, the primary goal is to boast about how much time you invest in your looks. Apparently these status updates also earn more Facebook likes than other kinds of posts.

Millennials Eat Up YouTube Food Videos

Excerpt from this article:

Whether consumers are looking for a flatbread recipe or watching their favorite foodie celebrity, food is thriving on YouTube. New research from Millward Brown Digital, Firefly, and Google delves into how YouTube is fueling the foodie fan culture, with insights into the audiences who devour food videos. They’re tuning in to watch videos that inspire, educate, or entertain. They’re loyal, passionate, and highly engaged, powering a 280% growth in food channel subscriptions over the past year.

 

The dark side of Guardian comments

Excerpt from this article:

How should digital news organisations respond to this? Some say it is simple – “Don’t read the comments” or, better still, switch them off altogether. And many have done just that, disabling their comment threads for good because they became too taxing to bother with.

But in so many cases journalism is enriched by responses from its readers. So why disable all comments when only a small minority is a problem?

At the Guardian, we felt it was high time to examine the problem rather than turn away.

We decided to treat the 70m comments that have been left on the Guardian – and in particular the comments that have been blocked by our moderators – as a huge data set to be explored rather than a problem to be brushed under the carpet.

This is what we discovered.

Investigating the Potential for Miscommunication Using Emoji

Example text conversation showing emoji miscommunication

Excerpt from this article:

Hey emoji users: Did you know that when you send your friend smiley 1  on your Nexus, they might see smiley 2 on their iPhone? …This type of thing can happen for all emoji… In a paper (download) that will be officially published at AAAI ICWSM in May, we show that this problem can cause people to misinterpret the emotion and the meaning of emoji-based communication, in some cases quite significantly…

What’s more, our work also showed that even when two people look at the exact same emoji rendering.., they often don’t interpret it the same way, leading to even more potential for miscommunication.

 

 

Why We Post: Social Media Through The Eyes of the World

Why We Post

Why We Post is “a global anthropological research project on the uses and consequences of social media” full of fascinating insights and myth-busting surprises. Check out the study website here, or read a commentary on the study in The Economist (link to the article); here is an excerpt:

These fly-on-the-wall perspectives refute much received wisdom. One of the sceptics’ biggest bêtes noires is the “selfie”—which is often blamed for fostering self-regard and an undue focus on attractiveness. “Why We Post”, however, reveals that the selfie itself has many faces. In Italy girls were indeed seen to take dozens of pictures of themselves before settling on one to post. In Brazil many selfies posted by men were taken at the gym. But at the British site, Dr Miller found, schoolchildren posted five times as many “groupies” (images of the picture-taker with friends) as they did selfies. Britons have also created a category called “uglies”, wherein the purpose is to take as unflattering a self-portrait as possible. And in Chile another unique genre has developed: the “footie”. This is a shot taken of the user’s propped-up feet, a sign of relaxation.

The often-humorous, marked-up images known as memes have also come in for criticism… Yet in all cases Dr Miller sees meme-passing not as limiting what social-media users think and say, but as enabling discourse. Many users happily forward memes laced with strong ideological messages about which they would not dare to comment individually.

“Why We Post” thus challenges the idea that the adoption of social media follows a single and predictable trajectory… The study also refutes the idea that social media are making humans any less human. Users are, in Dr Miller’s words, “merely attaining something that was latent in human beings”.

Thanks to Huw and Paul for the links!

Facebook Releases Guide on Transformational Trends and What They Mean for Marketers

Facebook Releases Guide on Transformational Trends and What They Mean for Marketers | Social Media Today

Excerpt from this article, via Benoit W and Paul M (thanks!):

Social media and digital technologies have changed the way we connect, interact, and really, the way we live our lives overall. But that influence has evolved over time, and as such, the significance of it may not be clear – if you were to tell someone that social media has changed the world as we know it, they’d likely scoff at the suggestion. But taking a step back from the day-to-day updates – the Likes, the selfies, the endless stream of emoji – move back from the superficial layer of the newly connected world and the wider societal impacts of social media become clear. Whether you know it or not – even whether you use the platforms or not – the impact of their presence are leading transformational shifts within our world, both online and off.

This, in essence, is the key focus of a new Facebook IQ study which seeks to “explore technology’s transformative role in our everyday lives”. To do this, Facebook commissioned research firm Crowd DNA to survey people from vastly different regions around the world and gather insights on how the impact of technology is resulting in shifts in attitudes, values and daily rituals. Facebook matched these findings against keywords and conversations around the same shifts across Facebook and Instagram, giving them an overview of how these elements are evolving based on connective technology.