“It Me,” You and Everyone We Know: A Look at the Web’s Most Ambiguous Meme

Excerpt from this article:

Enter the meme simply known as “it me.” On Twitter, “it me” often accompanies a selfie, a quoted headline or images from the web. Usually used as a punchline to a joke, the set-up to “it me” jokes are consistent: a mortifying, self-deprecating, factual or quirky image or statement. Or sometimes, though this is rare, a pun.

…My friend Sarah Hagi thinks “it me” is often used as a deflective tool, “For example, people don’t really believe mercury’s in retrograde, it’s just another way to pin how you feel on something else.” In that sense, “it me” functions as ironic humor. There’s a deflective quality to ironic humor. It masks the truth, though not the whole truth, revealing only a sliver of reality.

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Twitter Might Increase The Character Limit To 280 And People Responded With 2: “NO”

This is one of my favourite reactions (maybe you have to be Canadian for this to be funny):

Some of my other favourite reactions:

And check out more in this article.

The Rise of the Twitter Thread

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Excerpt from this article:

We don’t get to choose the literary genre of our epoch, and in this worst-of-times-worst-of-times political era, we have the Twitter thread. A series of tweets, written by one person and strung together by Twitter’s vertical border wall, the thread has emerged as this year’s ascendant form of argument: urgent, galloping, personality-driven and—depending on your view of the topic—either tacky and misleading or damned persuasive.

Readers of political Twitter know well a thread’s opening rumble. Threaders burst into being like tub-thumpers, without warning and from unexpected soapboxes; they generally announce themselves by pounding the bar: “THREAD.” (Sometimes, more recessively, they use the “1/”—a foreboding half-fraction suggesting a first installment with no end in sight.)

 

This Is Probably The Only Story You Didn’t Hear About First From Bradd Jaffy And Kyle Griffin

Excerpt from this article:

For those who follow his account, the tweet is vintage Griffin: a nugget of breaking news, packaged tightly with a line of inoffensive but somewhat incredulous analysis — as if to say, ‘omg, I know.’

He’s not alone. Bradd Jaffy — an editor and writer for the NBC Nightly News broadcast — has become a Twitter celebrity with a similar string of obsessive viral news posts. Jaffy boasts a larger following than Griffin, with about 245,000 followers. The two men, who at MSNBC and NBC Nightly News work in different parts of the company, are said to share something of a rivalry, according to sources. (NBCUniversal is an investor in BuzzFeed.)

Be it a press conference on Capitol Hill, cabinet meeting pool spray from the White House, Trump golf outing, or fiery segment on Morning Joe — you’ll see it first from Jaffy or Griffin. When a reporter in the NBC News operation has an exclusive, Jaffy or Griffin are often first to post the relevant details. Between the two, they somehow manage to tweet virtually every piece of news and opinion of the day — from a fact-check of that morning’s controversial Trump tweet, to a late-night Washington Post or New York Times bombshell report — and always with plenty of screenshots.

As news cycles grow faster and more overwhelming, Jaffy and Griffin have become feeds of record for obsessive political journalists and casual Twitter users alike. Their relentless output, which, in a different environment, might have felt exhausting, is now a mooring force for a growing number who feel bombarded by breaking news and fear they might miss the next bombshell.