Prozac Nation Is Now the United States of Xanax

Excerpt from this article:

This past winter, Sarah Fader, a 37-year-old social media consultant in Brooklyn who has generalized anxiety disorder, texted a friend in Oregon about an impending visit, and when a quick response failed to materialize, she posted on Twitter to her 16,000-plus followers. “I don’t hear from my friend for a day — my thought, they don’t want to be my friend anymore,” she wrote, appending the hashtag #ThisIsWhatAnxietyFeelsLike.

Thousands of people were soon offering up their own examples under the hashtag; some were retweeted more than 1,000 times. You might say Ms. Fader struck a nerve. “If you’re a human being living in 2017 and you’re not anxious,” she said on the telephone, “there’s something wrong with you.”

…Anxiety has become our everyday argot, our thrumming lifeblood: not just on Twitter (the ur-anxious medium, with its constant updates), but also in blogger diaries, celebrity confessionals…

HAPPY ED BALLS DAY

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Excerpt from this article:

In the annals of pseudo-holidays… there is none, to my mind, more pleasing than April 28th, on which Britons the Internet wide observe the anniversary of the time a distracted politician accidentally tweeted his own name… The politician in question is the Labour M.P. and Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer Edward Michael (Ed) Balls. At 4:20 p.m. on April 28, 2011, Balls was in a grocery store in Yorkshire, picking up the ingredients for his signature fourteen-hour pulled pork. Somewhere between the white buns and the watermelon, he got a call from an aide. The aide urged him to search Twitter for an article that mentioned him. Balls hit the wrong key on his Blackberry and tweeted the now immortal phrase: “Ed Balls.”

How to Know If You’ve Sent a Horrible Tweet

Excerpt from this article:

Twitter is a much-maligned, ever-burning furnace of existential dread. At its best, it’s an efficient tool for communication, even if that only means telling people to go fuck themselves. But unlike on other forms of social media, where the success of a post might be measured in terms of the discussion it generates—a busy comment section under a blog post, or thousands of comments on a Facebook page—on Twitter, provoking a significant response is actually evidence of the opposite. The lengthier the conversation, the surer it is that someone royally messed up. It’s a phenomenon known as The Ratio. While opinions on the exact numerical specifications of The Ratio vary, in short, it goes something like this: If the number of replies to a tweet vastly outpaces its engagement in terms of likes and retweets, then something has gone horribly wrong.

A Very British Response to Terror

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These moments encapsulated something about Britain’s calm, defiant response to the threat of terror. Even as we face an increasing number of attacks, we are learning to cope with grief, loss and violence in our own way…

In the face of this, we’re choosing vigilance, calm and just a little bit of humor. And any fear projected on to us will be met with a very British response: Sarcasm.

…A New York Times headline that said that London was “reeling” from the Manchester attack also became the subject of British Twitter’s wrath. Brits turned #ThingsThatLeaveBritainReeling into a hashtag that started to trend higher than the news of the attack itself.

See also this article on #ThingsThatLeaveBritainReeling.

Covfefe is a word now. Deal with it

Excerpt from this article (and see also this one for background):

Trump’s tweet went thus: “Despite the constant negative press covfefe”, and that was it. Keyboard detectives have pointed out that the strokes needed to type “erage” are vaguely similar to “fefe”, and that would fit semantically with the rest of the brainfart. So, boringly enough, he meant to type “coverage”. But it was too late. Covfefe was born.

And with it, the new discipline of Covfefe studies.

This Scottish man’s Twitter feed is blowing up for all the wrong reasons

Excerpt from this article:

Remember John Lewis, the American computer science educator who’s forever being mistaken for both a congressman and a British department store?

Well, he’s not the only one.

With increasing mentions of Donald Trump’s Chief Strategist Steve Bannon cropping up in the news, one man from Scotland has found himself on the receiving end up a huge surge of misdirected tweets.

Introducing @SteveBannon — Scottish man living in the southwest of England, father of three, and very much not a senior advisor to Donald Trump