Unfollowing Everybody

 

Excerpt from this article:

It’s been about a week and a half, and, well… Twitter is a lot more pleasant. I’ve chosen a handful of accounts to follow each day (most ones that I followed before, some entirely new to me) and it’s made a big difference. On the flip side, about 100 people seem to have unfollowed me after I unfollowed everybody, and I hope they hadn’t felt obligated just to reciprocate if I was following them before. (That might also just be how many people unfollow me in a given week, I dunno.)

One of the most immediate benefits is that, when something terrible happens in the news, I don’t see an endless, repetitive stream of dozens of people reacting to it in succession. It turns out, I don’t mind knowing about current events, but it hurts to see lots of people I care about going through anguish or pain when bad news happens. I want to optimize for being aware, but not emotionally overwhelmed.

To that point, I’ve also basically not refollowed any news accounts or “official” corporate accounts. Anything I need to know about major headlines gets surfaced through other channels, or even just other parts of Twitter, so I don’t need to see social media updates from media companies whose entire economic model is predicated on causing me enough stress to click through to their sites.

Similarly, I’ve focused a lot more on artists and activists and people who write about the stuff I’m obsessed with in general — Prince or mangoes or urban transit or the like. That brings a lot more joy into my life, and people writing about these other topics offer alot more inspiration for the things I want to be focused on. Oddly, given that my job is being the CEO of a tech company, I follow far fewer people in tech, and almost no tech company accounts except for my own. Despite that, I’ve missed almost nothing significant in the industry since making this change.

 

And Now, I Unfollow Thee

Illustration by Federica Bordoni

Excerpt from this article:

Noah Masterson, a web marketing manager in Austin, Tex., is like the Marie Kondo of Twitter. He keeps it tidy. “I just unfollowed about 20 people to get down to an even 400,” he said. “It felt really good.”

For Mr. Masterson, 43, the value of social media is that it brings together all sorts of voices and opinions that he may not otherwise hear. But if he decides one voice is too shrill, too self-promotional or too dull, he will declutter. “It’s a party, and I get to select the guests,” he said. “I can just eject someone if they’re not being a good guest.”

…But there are so many awkward dynamics that can arise, because rarely is the severing of these social ties a stealth act. Those who have landed on your cutting-room floor can learn of the shunning in any number of ways. That’s why the subtler function of muting someone, offered by Facebook and Twitter, is popular: Mutees have no way of knowing they’ve been tuned out. The posters keep posting and posting, having no idea that they are trees falling in the forest without anyone there to hear the thud.

…“You feel like you’re breaking this fake friendship, and that can be really awkward because on Twitter especially, people really do become friendly,” Ms. Notopoulos said. “A social contract develops, kind of like, if someone invites you to their wedding, you have to invite them to yours even if you don’t like them that much. It’s easy to start wondering, ‘Am I being a jerk for unfollowing them?’ In those cases, I find the mute button a godsend.”

Why I Unfollowed You on Instagram

Excerpt from this article on Medium, where the writer theorizes that “The Social Network is Yesterday, The Interest Feed is Tomorrow“, and which I found after someone tweeted that following this advice was the best thing they could have ever done to make their social media experience better:

I’m looking for an intelligent feed of my interests. A feed of stuff I’m going to like, drawn from a white-list of trusted curators but personalized for me. Not specific to one vertical (News, Music, Stuff to Buy, etc) or one content type (movies, photos, text, links). Ordered by the most relevant, the stuff I need to see RIGHT NOW.

I’ve found hiring these tools for the specific tasks they’re best at has extended their relevance to me by amplifying their value. All this to say — this is why I unfollowed you on Instagram, just like I did on Twitter a few years ago.

I use Facebook to keep a network of people I actually know IRL. There’s real utility to this network and the smaller it is the more useful it can be. This is where I post things that are personal and things that people who know me would appreciate but are not meant for “public”.

On Facebook it’s possible to “Like” bands, companies, brands, etc but I am un-Like-ing those instead. I want Facebook to do this one thing well — give me access to and filter the internet via a network of people I know IRL. Facebook will not be The Interest Graph. We’ve already watched AOL try to be Yahoo!, Yahoo! try to be Google, and Google try to be Facebook. No dominant player from the previous era will ever own the next era, too. This will be a new, purpose-built tool.

I use Twitter as a feed of news and humor. Once I stopped following people I know or celebrities I like and managed my list of Twitter followers as the list of bylines I’d like to see in my dream publication, my feed got interesting again. That said, I don’t consume it very often anymore for the reasons mentioned above.

I use LinkedIn to keep a network of people I’ve worked with and remember well enough to offer a recommendation about (positive or negative). If I don’t know you, I don’t accept your request. However, while I intellectualize this theoretical value, I never open the LinkedIn app unless I’m hiring. I do read the LinkedIn emails of news and updates on people in my network, though, so I find culling this list valuable.

Snapchat I use to communicate with a select few people and watch vertical video when I’m bored. The channel offering is limited and Snapchat has neither encouraged me to follow too many people nor put the most interesting stuff at the top for me yet.

Instagram, on the other hand, is special in that it is a medium for creativity, not information. “Creativity loves constraints”, “a picture is worth a thousand words”, and the (initially) square box of Instagram allowed all of us to communicate a moment as artistically as we were capable. Popular artists of the medium were born. Artists embraced the medium. I love Instagram in an emotional way I don’t love any of these other services.