Inbox of Forgotten Emails

Check out this website:

The Inbox of Forgotten Emails will act as a window into the world of unsent messages, never reaching their intended audience, but still finding a reader.

How do I contribute?

You can submit an email from your drafts, send one to us by email, make up a sender, your own name, and other details. All emails submitted are with the intention of being publicly viewable.

Are my emails anonymous?

Yup! You can submit using a pseudonym, and your email address is never shared.

Wait, why are you doing this?

Instead of sending that angry email to your colleague or desperate email to your ex, just share it anonymously for the world to see that we are not alone in our desperate email writing moments.

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The Death and Life of Great American GeoCities

Excerpt from this article:

[The blog] Animated Text is part of a retro aesthetic renaissance sweeping the Web, one that pays homage to old-school computing systems and software like Windows 95 and Microsoft Paint. Nostalgia certainly plays a part, in the same way it does with collectors of vinyl or old typewriters, and for good reason: This revival is, in many respects, a reaction to the manicured lawns of Facebook and Twitter and a celebration of the earlier, less sterile (and surveilled) environments that people once inhabited and created online.

…Presented in isolation, these nearly extinct images and file formats become something like works of art — or at least digital tchotchkes for a generation too young to remember the blend of frustration and awe a 56K modem could inspire but old enough to appreciate the beauty of its early transmissions.

Is it the Beginning of the End for Online Comments?

The Daily Dot recently became the latest news website to get rid of user comments

Excerpt from this article:

Vibrant online communities? Or cesspools of abuse? Have comments had their day?

The debate about comment sections on news sites is often as divisive as the comments themselves. Recently outlets such as The Verge and The Daily Dot have closed their comments sections because they’ve become too hard to manage. And they’re far from alone.

That’s the downside. But it’s also worth remembering that many news organisations – including the BBC – have used comments sections to make real connections with audiences, find stories, and turn what was once a one-way street into a multi-headed conversation.

In our experience, our community hasn’t evolved in our comments. It’s evolved in our social media accounts. To have comments, you have to be very active, and if you’re not incredibly active, what ends up happening is a mob can shout down all the other people on your site. In an environment that isn’t heavily curated it becomes about silencing voices and not about opening up voices.