If you really want to remember a moment, try not to take a photo

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One of the major reasons we take photos in the first place is to remember a moment long after it has passed: the birth of a baby, a reunion, a pristine lake. In 2015, I conducted a Bored and Brilliant Project — in which I challenged people to detach from their devices in order to jump-start their creativity — with more than 20,000 listeners of Note to Self (the podcast about technology that I host). When I surveyed the participants, many said they used photos as a “memory aid,” taking pictures of things like parking spots or the label of the hot sauce at a restaurant to buy later. However, every time we snap a quick pic of something, we could in fact be harming our memory of it.

In one study, students were told to take photos of objects at a museum — and they remembered fewer of the overall objects they had photographed.

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People Are Sharing Pics Of Boyfriends “Forced” To Take Perfect Pictures Of Their Girlfriends

Boyfriends Photoshoot Girlfriends

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The ‘Boyfriends Of Instagram’ page shares hilarious photos of boyfriends going to ridiculous lengths to capture the perfect shot of their girlfriend. From standing on the edge of a hot tub to crouching or even lying down – these boyfriends are the real masters behind all those money shots.

 

For Wedding Photography, Some Couples Eschew a Pro in Favor of GoPro

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In a move to save money and contribute to the “winging it” feel, a handful of couples are relying on relatives and friends — their pockets and purses jammed with GoPro cameras, cellphones and mini iPads — to capture the bride taking that nervous breath before she walks down the aisle or the groom hugging his father, tears in their eyes.

“Two years ago, this was a conversation you never would have had,” said David Tutera, a celebrity wedding planner and the host of the TV show “David Tutera’s Celebrations.”

Few are likely to miss the photo assistants holding large reflectors and shouting, “Look here!” But the more casual approach to capturing important wedding moments has had mixed results.

“Everyone we know has an iPhone, and most take beautiful pictures on Instagram, so we knew they’d be fine,” said Samantha Resnik, 33, whose wedding to Mark Edmunds, 43, included a large reception on May 21 at the West End Hall, on upper Broadway. A single photographer, she said, cannot be everywhere at once. “He can’t possibly capture what 175 guests can,” Ms. Resnik said.

In addition to asking guests to use hashtags on Facebook or Instagram to post photos, couples are now relying solely on them to tell a visual story.

Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity

Findface has amassed 500,000 users in the short time since the launch

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If the founders of a new face recognition app get their way, anonymity in public could soon be a thing of the past. FindFace, launched two months ago and currently taking Russia by storm, allows users to photograph people in a crowd and work out their identities, with 70% reliability.

It works by comparing photographs to profile pictures on Vkontakte, a social network popular in Russia and the former Soviet Union, with more than 200 million accounts. In future, the designers imagine a world where people walking past you on the street could find your social network profile by sneaking a photograph of you, and shops, advertisers and the police could pick your face out of crowds and track you down via social networks.

… Kabakov says the app could revolutionise dating: “If you see someone you like, you can photograph them, find their identity, and then send them a friend request.” The interaction doesn’t always have to involve the rather creepy opening gambit of clandestine street photography, he added: “It also looks for similar people. So you could just upload a photo of a movie star you like, or your ex, and then find 10 girls who look similar to her and send them messages.”

Some have sounded the alarm about the potentially disturbing implications. Already the app has been used by a St Petersburg photographer to snap and identify people on the city’s metro, as well as by online vigilantes to uncover the social media profiles of female porn actors and harass them.

Now Instagram Husbands Have the Support Group They’ve Always Needed

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A new spoof video is advertising a support group for guys who are stuck taking pictures for their wives’ Instagram accounts.

Some of these Instagram Husbands claim to be thrilled about their duties—which include snapping tons of pictures, helping choreograph the perfect shots, and commenting on every upload. But others are starting to get worn down—and they’re sick of being human selfie sticks.

Boyfriends and husbands of the world who’ve ever been scolded for taking a sip of their cappuccino before it was properly photographed, this video is for you.